My New Year’s Genealogy Resolutions for 2008

In Roman mythology, Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, beginnings, and endings. His most apparent remnants in modern culture are his namesakes, the month of January and the caretaker of doors and halls: Janitor.

Janus was usually depicted with two faces looking in opposite directions. Janus was frequently used to symbolize change and transitions such as the progression of past to future, of one condition to another, of one vision to another, the growing up of young people, and of one universe to another. He was also known as the figure representing time because he could see into the past with one face and into the future with the other. Hence, Janus was worshipped at the beginnings of the harvest and planting times, as well as marriages, births and other beginnings.

Wikipedia contributors, “Janus (mythology),” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Janus_%28mythology%29&oldid=180708812 (accessed December 31, 2007).

I suppose if we genea-bloggers lived in Roman times, we would worship Janus. He would make a wonderful god of genealogy! He could see the past and the future, and was celebrated at births, marriages, and other beginnings, events we celebrate as well. Like Janus, we are the keepers of the gates, doors, and hallways into our family histories; those entrusted with the keys. We are janitors–custodians–of the past for the generations that come after.

My post today is a reflection of my 2007 genealogy resolutions and a listing the ones for 2008. Like Janus, I am looking both directions at once. I had five goals for the year 2007, and much of my 2008 resolutions will be a continuance of them, while I have added a couple of new things as well. Here is my 2007 list, with comments on how I did:

1. To continue and to improve my process of recording my research, especially when I search online databases. I’ve done much better than I ever have in recording where I’ve been when searching online, but there still is room for improvement. My problem is impatience…I don’t want to slow myself down to record where I looked, and then I end up wasting time in the long run by repeating searches. I did create an Online Research Form to help me, and I resolve to do better in 2008.

2. To cite my sources properly. It’s a lot of work, especially to go back and re-cite 20 years’ worth of information that I used to enter in note form on my computer. I give myself an A on this resolution, as far as my databases went. I used my RootsMagic citation wizard a lot this year and went back and started re-entering (or entering for the first time) my sources. There’s still much work ahead, but the acquisition of Evidence Explained! was a bonus for my genealogical toolbox. I do need to make sure that I cite my sources correctly on this blog, and go back and cite old posts.

3. To photograph and log my genealogical “treasures,” items that have once belonged to my ancestors and late relatives. Hmm…I kind of forgot about this one. I was going to have a private blog to log the treasures, but I think Tim Abbott’s Cabinet of Curiosities is going to be a good way to record these. Scanfest is also a part of this. I’ll renew this resolution as well.

4. To begin to slowly change my hard copy files from a file folder system to a notebook system, using archival-safe, acid-free page protectors. Nope. This one was a dud. It was expensive, time-consuming, and an inefficient way for me to store and access my records. I started to keep my HOEKSTRA materials this way, and although it looked very good and professional, it just was plain awkward. My original plan was to prepare materials for a possible book, but I’ve got too much research ahead of me to do any near publishing. I’ve decided to stick with file folders for all my family lines, and I’ve been implementing Sharon DeBartolo Carmack’s system explained in Organizing Your Family History Search. RootsMagic allows me to color code family lines, and I’m using colored folders for my files: blue for my dad’s lines, red for Mom’s, and green and yellow respectively for my father- and mother-in-law’s lines. Also, orange is for my maternal step-grandfather’s family and purple is for my paternal grandmother’s adoptive family lines. So while the original resolution didn’t work, its alternative has.

5. To continue to blog at this location…to be consistent in writing both prompts and responses for my new blog, AnceStories2. I deserve an A+ for the first part, but receive a D for the second. This is my 340th post since last year’s resolution on this blog, but I sloughed off badly on AnceStories2. I don’t want to abandon it, so I’ve decided to continue to post enough prompts up to Week 52, giving readers a year’s worth of prompts. From that point on, I’ll probably blog occasionally on various other ways to record one’s memories.

My 2008 resolutions are to continue with the five points of focus above, either in the same vein or the altered goal I’ve mentioned. Additionally, there are two other goals I want to work on, preservation and writing. The first requires that I lease a safety-deposit box at my financial institution in which to safely keep original documents and family treasures, photo negatives, and computer backups. I’m also going to buy some larger flash drives to back up my files on a regular basis. The second involves doing more non-blog writing by submitting articles for publication. But I’d also like to blog my mother’s letters in a private blog, perhaps as preparation for a book.

There you have it: record; cite; archive and preserve; organize; and blog and write. I think I’ll make a little sign with these goals and hang it near my computer as a daily reminder. What are your goals or resolutions for 2008?

My New Year’s Genealogy Resolutions for 2008

In Roman mythology, Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, beginnings, and endings. His most apparent remnants in modern culture are his namesakes, the month of January and the caretaker of doors and halls: Janitor.

Janus was usually depicted with two faces looking in opposite directions. Janus was frequently used to symbolize change and transitions such as the progression of past to future, of one condition to another, of one vision to another, the growing up of young people, and of one universe to another. He was also known as the figure representing time because he could see into the past with one face and into the future with the other. Hence, Janus was worshipped at the beginnings of the harvest and planting times, as well as marriages, births and other beginnings.

Wikipedia contributors, “Janus (mythology),” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Janus_%28mythology%29&oldid=180708812 (accessed December 31, 2007).

I suppose if we genea-bloggers lived in Roman times, we would worship Janus. He would make a wonderful god of genealogy! He could see the past and the future, and was celebrated at births, marriages, and other beginnings, events we celebrate as well. Like Janus, we are the keepers of the gates, doors, and hallways into our family histories; those entrusted with the keys. We are janitors–custodians–of the past for the generations that come after.

My post today is a reflection of my 2007 genealogy resolutions and a listing the ones for 2008. Like Janus, I am looking both directions at once. I had five goals for the year 2007, and much of my 2008 resolutions will be a continuance of them, while I have added a couple of new things as well. Here is my 2007 list, with comments on how I did:

1. To continue and to improve my process of recording my research, especially when I search online databases. I’ve done much better than I ever have in recording where I’ve been when searching online, but there still is room for improvement. My problem is impatience…I don’t want to slow myself down to record where I looked, and then I end up wasting time in the long run by repeating searches. I did create an Online Research Form to help me, and I resolve to do better in 2008.

2. To cite my sources properly. It’s a lot of work, especially to go back and re-cite 20 years’ worth of information that I used to enter in note form on my computer. I give myself an A on this resolution, as far as my databases went. I used my RootsMagic citation wizard a lot this year and went back and started re-entering (or entering for the first time) my sources. There’s still much work ahead, but the acquisition of Evidence Explained! was a bonus for my genealogical toolbox. I do need to make sure that I cite my sources correctly on this blog, and go back and cite old posts.

3. To photograph and log my genealogical “treasures,” items that have once belonged to my ancestors and late relatives. Hmm…I kind of forgot about this one. I was going to have a private blog to log the treasures, but I think Tim Abbott’s Cabinet of Curiosities is going to be a good way to record these. Scanfest is also a part of this. I’ll renew this resolution as well.

4. To begin to slowly change my hard copy files from a file folder system to a notebook system, using archival-safe, acid-free page protectors. Nope. This one was a dud. It was expensive, time-consuming, and an inefficient way for me to store and access my records. I started to keep my HOEKSTRA materials this way, and although it looked very good and professional, it just was plain awkward. My original plan was to prepare materials for a possible book, but I’ve got too much research ahead of me to do any near publishing. I’ve decided to stick with file folders for all my family lines, and I’ve been implementing Sharon DeBartolo Carmack’s system explained in Organizing Your Family History Search. RootsMagic allows me to color code family lines, and I’m using colored folders for my files: blue for my dad’s lines, red for Mom’s, and green and yellow respectively for my father- and mother-in-law’s lines. Also, orange is for my maternal step-grandfather’s family and purple is for my paternal grandmother’s adoptive family lines. So while the original resolution didn’t work, its alternative has.

5. To continue to blog at this location…to be consistent in writing both prompts and responses for my new blog, AnceStories2. I deserve an A+ for the first part, but receive a D for the second. This is my 340th post since last year’s resolution on this blog, but I sloughed off badly on AnceStories2. I don’t want to abandon it, so I’ve decided to continue to post enough prompts up to Week 52, giving readers a year’s worth of prompts. From that point on, I’ll probably blog occasionally on various other ways to record one’s memories.

My 2008 resolutions are to continue with the five points of focus above, either in the same vein or the altered goal I’ve mentioned. Additionally, there are two other goals I want to work on, preservation and writing. The first requires that I lease a safety-deposit box at my financial institution in which to safely keep original documents and family treasures, photo negatives, and computer backups. I’m also going to buy some larger flash drives to back up my files on a regular basis. The second involves doing more non-blog writing by submitting articles for publication. But I’d also like to blog my mother’s letters in a private blog, perhaps as preparation for a book.

There you have it: record; cite; archive and preserve; organize; and blog and write. I think I’ll make a little sign with these goals and hang it near my computer as a daily reminder. What are your goals or resolutions for 2008?

The California Death Index on RootsWeb

I’ve been using the California Death Index at RootsWeb a lot this evening to look up Midkiff descendants for my husband’s family tree database. A distant cousin is preparing to publish a new book on the Midkiff family, and has asked that we submit updated descendant reports of their primary ancestors, Franklin Preston MIDKIFF and Ellender “Nellie” OLIVER. Of course, any living descendants will not be included, but there is much data in the family tree that needs tidying. I’m particularly looking up death dates and places in the various death indexes online, both state death indexes and the Social Security Death Index, for those descendants that are likely to be deceased (appearing as aged 80 or above in hubby’s database).

A couple of things I noticed of which other researchers should also be aware. The first is that the Soundex feature doesn’t apply to either the mother’s maiden name or father’s last name when running a search; only the surname of the deceased that you are searching for will have their name Soundexed. That may be true of the Metaphone feature as well (I haven’t checked). So searching for children whose mother’s maiden name is Midkiff, and using the Soundex feature will only bring up the exact Midkiff spelling under the category “Mother’s Maiden Name,” and not Medkiff, Medkeff, Metkeff and other strange varieties that I often see.

Another warning comes with possible errors in the California Death Index where it is linked to the Social Security Death Index, also on RootsWeb. I found that John Leland KIRBY, Sr., who married a Midkiff descendant, had the Social Security number 560-03-5333 linked on his entry in the California Death Index. When I clicked on the link, I was brought to the SSDI page for Louis ESCALLIER (“What the heck?!”). Running John’s birth and death year through the SSDI search engine cleared up the matter. His Social Security Number was 560-03-3333. Also, the SSDI states his birthday was 22 Oct 1899, whereas the California Death Index says 22 Sep 1899.

So which is correct? It’s hard to say, but my guess is that since the error for the Social Security Number came on the part of the California Death Index, then it’s more likely that the CDI’s birth date for Kirby is also incorrect. Looks like there was some sloppy data entry here (not that I’ve ever done that before!).

All that said, the California Death Index is a great help and guide to obtaining original records. I’ve been able to sort out relationships and find more family members by using this resource. By putting this data on our family trees and then uploading my GEDCOM to RootsWeb’s WorldConnect, I’ve been contacted by many Midkiff descendants over the years and been able to verify the information as well as share with them their family history.

Research Log: MIDKIFFs in the 1920 Census

I spent some time this morning looking for John Franklin MIDKIFF, Jr. in 1920 U.S. Federal Census (it was his future wife and in-laws, the WESTABYs, that I recently discovered at long last, on the 1920 census). Since John was only an almost-ten-year-old boy, I searched mainly for his father, John Franklin MIDKIFF, Sr. The household should look like this:

John Franklin MIDKIFF – age 49, born Texas
Margie Ethel (TOLLIVER) MIDKIFF – age 32, born Nebraska
Edna Susan MIDKIFF (from John’s first marriage) – age 15, born Colorado
Ruth Ethel MIDKIFF – age 11, born Colorado
John Franklin MIDKIFF, Jr. – age 9, born Colorado
Dorothy Zada MIDKIFF – age 5, born Idaho

The family could also include any of the older married children, in-laws, and grandchildren of John, Sr. and his first wife, Ella Lydia WILLIS. They are:

Charles Nathaniel MIDKIFF, Sr. – age 25, born Oklahoma
Marie Marcella (WELLS) MIDKIFF – age 23, born Idaho
Charles Nathaniel MIDKIFF, Jr. – age 3, born Idaho
Edna Marie MIDKIFF – age 1 6/12, born Utah

Myrtle Mary (MIDKIFF) ARTER – age 22, born Oklahoma
James Montgomery ARTER – age c. 31, born Pennsylvania
Agusta Mary ARTER – age 4, born Idaho
possibly Jim-or James-ARTER – details unknown
possibly Edith ARTER – details unknown

Iva Ella (MIDKIFF) HURST – age 17, born Colorado
James L. HURST – age 22, born Nebraska
James N. HURST – age 3/12, born California

I started doing some simple searches on Ancestry.com, but did not get any matches to this family. I have lots more possibilities, but this is just a start. Below are the search terms I used and the subsequent results. I used my Online Research Log to keep track of my research.

john, midkiff, exact search; 45 hits, no matches

john, midkiff, soundex search, birthplace: texas; 3 hits, no matches

john, midkiff, soundex search, birth year: 1870 +/- 2 years; 12 hits, no matches

j, midkiff, exact search; 57 hits, no matches

j, midkiff, soundex search, birthplace: texas; 5 hits, no matches

j, midkiff, sounex search, birth year: 1870 +/- 2 years; 10 hits, no matches

john, exact search, birthplace: texas; birth year: 1870 +/- 2 years, father’s birthplace: tennessee, mother’s birthplace: illinois; 2 hits, no matches

j,exact search, birthplace: texas; birth year: 1870 +/- 2 years, father’s birthplace: tennessee, mother’s birthplace: illinois; 10 hits, no matches

[blank], exact search, birthplace: texas, birth year: 1870 +/- 2 years, residence: idaho; 106 hits, no matches

[blank], exact search, birthplace: texas, birth year: 1870 +/- 2 years, relationship: head; residence: washington; 150 hits, no matches

[blank], exact search, birthplace: texas, birth year: 1870 +/- 2 years, wife: margie; 18 hits, no matches

[blank], exact search, birthplace: texas, birth year: 1870 +/- 2 years, wife: marg*; 352 hits, no matches

I then went on to try various other children in this household:

dorothy, exact search, birthplace: idaho; birth year: 1914 +/- 2 years, father’s birthplace: texas, mother’s birthplace: nebraska; 1 hit, no match

john, exact search, birthplace: colorado, birth year: 1910 +/- 2 years, father’s birthplace: texas, mother’s birthplace: nebraska; 1 hit, no match

john, exact search, birthplace: colorado, birth year: 1910 +/- 2 years, residence: idaho; 17 hits, no matches

john, exact search, birthplace: colorado, birth year: 1910 +/- 2 years, residence: colorado; 90 hits, no matches

john, exact search, birth year: 1910 +/- 2 years, residence: butte county, california; 100 hits, no matches

j, exact search, birth year: 1910 +/- 2 years, residence: butte county, california; 100 hits, no matches

Theories:

1) This family is not on the census at all due to moving around the country (probably from Idaho and/or Utah to Northern California). However, given that it was winter, that probably doesn’t make sense.

2) They are on the census, but “Midkiff” is badly mangled in the index…or was written as METCALF(E), a different Soundex code.

3) They are living with other relatives, and I need to look for all adult children and siblings of John and/or his wife, Margie.

The Year in Review (2007)

This is the time of year when newspapers, magazines, television shows and websites list the year in review, and I thought I’d join in with a personalized version of my own. Two Thousand Seven was a fantastic, wonderful year, genealogically-speaking. Though I wasn’t able to get a lot of records research done, I was able to dig deeper into the personal and family history of my ancestors to uncover rich, detailed information that had been unknown to me. What immediately comes to mind is discovering, quite by accident, that my great-grandparents were charter members of the American Legion, Reinhart W. Roman Post 537 and Women’s Auxiliary in Conklin, Ottawa Co., Michigan, after stumbling upon a website of the history of Chester Township. I never would have imagined all the delightful treasures and experiences I came across this year! Here they are, in no particular order, my top ten list:

  • 1. Blogging Joy
  • Although I started this blog nearly two years ago (16 January 2006), it wasn’t until I started writing for the Carnival of Genealogy and switched to this current URL on January 22nd that things really took off for me, both as a blogger and in readership numbers. But really what has been the best reward of blogging my genealogy has been the sense of community and the dear friends I’ve made. From the many carnivals that have sprung up (Cabinet of Curiosities, Carnival of Central and East European Genealogy, Carnival of Irish Heritage and Culture, and the Advent Calendar of Christmas Memories) to Scanfest (the brainchild of Susan Kitchens, by the way!) to banding together during the Ancestry Internet Biographical Collections controversy, I’ve learned about the personal and genealogical trials and triumphs of people I’ve never met face-to-face (but hope to!), and have been encouraged and educated by them along the way. I hope I’ve given equally in return.

  • 2. My 15 Minutes of Fame
  • It was very exciting to have my local newspaper feature me in their Home and Garden section as they highlighted my genealogical treasures. Hopefully, my emphasis on the Eastern Washington Genealogical Society during the interview will increase awareness and attendance of our society within our community. I was also interviewed by U.S. News and World Report (as a user of Ancestry.com) and an representative of Google Reader’s public relations department (on my Alice Teddy the Rollerskating Bear find here and here). U.S. News has so far not published my interview; and the Google Reader interview was for a possible future press release. That the media is covering genealogy and family history more and more is, I believe, an indication of public awareness and interest in these areas.

  • 3. Collections from My Ancestors
  • Two large collections of documents, photos, and letters made their way into my home this past year. After the death of my maternal grandfather last January, I started receiving items from my uncle who was the executor of the estate of my grandparents. I’m still in the process of scanning, adding to my database, and analyzing what I call the DeVRIES-HOEKSTRA collection. Additionally, my uncle blessed me by doing his own on-site research–and then sharing it with me–on the houses that our families occupied in Grand Rapids, Michigan from the time the DeVRIES family arrived there in 1897. Secondly, one of my paternal aunts sent several CDs of scanned materials from my great-grandfather’s experiences in North Russia at the end of World War I. My posts on this subject have generated a lot of readership, not just from the genealogical community, but from the military and history communities as well. I still have more posts to blog about his “adventures” there and what happened after he returned to the U.S.

  • 4. A Collection from My Husband’s Ancestors
  • Recently, my father-in-law loaned my husband and me a box full of old and modern family photos and dozens of postcards received by his maternal grandparents, mainly during the years 1908 to the early 1950s. I look forward to scanning, entering into my husband’s database, and analyzing these materials.

  • 5. Presentations
  • This year brought fabulous opportunities for me to make presentations to various groups around the Inland Northwest. In March, I did two presentations at the local LDS Church’s Family History Conference, and in June, the Bonner County (Idaho) Genealogical Society invited me to be their featured speaker at their genealogical conference. I also had the opportunity to share “Frugal Genealogy” with the Kootenai County (Idaho) Genealogical Society in October. I also taught three EWGS computer classes for members this past year. These experiences allowed me to meet other researchers and see what kinds of resources are available in outlying communities.

  • 6. Starting a New Class
  • One of the results of some successful Online Beginning Genealogy classes that I taught through my local community colleges’ district was being asked to start an Intermediate class, which begins later next month.

  • 7. Letters from My Childhood
  • I took a walk down memory lane by reading the letters my mother had written to her parents from 1966 – 1978. There’s some terrific material there…perhaps even a book.

  • 8. Grave Photos
  • Some wonderful volunteers at Find A Grave were able to take photos of graves of ancestors of my husband and me. These included my 3rd-great-grandmother, Maria Marina (VanKLINKEN) TON BYL, made all the more bittersweet since she is buried in a Potter’s Field in an unmarked grave.

  • 9. Surprises
  • As I’ve mentioned above, I discovered my ROBBINS family was instrumental in starting up an American Legion Post, and my JACKSON relatives trained a rollerskating bear! Another great discovery was finding my husband’s WESTABY ancestors in the 1920 Census, at long last!

  • 10. Freebies and Income
    It’s always nice to be rewarded or earn something doing what comes naturally and for which you are passionate! Thanks to the great people at Footnote.com, Genealogy Publishing Company, and MemoryPress, I’ve tasted the sweet fruits of my labor.

I can only dare to dream that 2008 can match or surpass 2007 in the wealth of what I’ve experienced! I wish all my readers, fellow genea-bloggers, and family members the very best in the coming New Year. May your brick walls come crashing down, and may all your ancestor hunts be successful and rewarding!

The California Death Index on RootsWeb

I’ve been using the California Death Index at RootsWeb a lot this evening to look up Midkiff descendants for my husband’s family tree database. A distant cousin is preparing to publish a new book on the Midkiff family, and has asked that we submit updated descendant reports of their primary ancestors, Franklin Preston MIDKIFF and Ellender “Nellie” OLIVER. Of course, any living descendants will not be included, but there is much data in the family tree that needs tidying. I’m particularly looking up death dates and places in the various death indexes online, both state death indexes and the Social Security Death Index, for those descendants that are likely to be deceased (appearing as aged 80 or above in hubby’s database).

A couple of things I noticed of which other researchers should also be aware. The first is that the Soundex feature doesn’t apply to either the mother’s maiden name or father’s last name when running a search; only the surname of the deceased that you are searching for will have their name Soundexed. That may be true of the Metaphone feature as well (I haven’t checked). So searching for children whose mother’s maiden name is Midkiff, and using the Soundex feature will only bring up the exact Midkiff spelling under the category “Mother’s Maiden Name,” and not Medkiff, Medkeff, Metkeff and other strange varieties that I often see.

Another warning comes with possible errors in the California Death Index where it is linked to the Social Security Death Index, also on RootsWeb. I found that John Leland KIRBY, Sr., who married a Midkiff descendant, had the Social Security number 560-03-5333 linked on his entry in the California Death Index. When I clicked on the link, I was brought to the SSDI page for Louis ESCALLIER (“What the heck?!”). Running John’s birth and death year through the SSDI search engine cleared up the matter. His Social Security Number was 560-03-3333. Also, the SSDI states his birthday was 22 Oct 1899, whereas the California Death Index says 22 Sep 1899.

So which is correct? It’s hard to say, but my guess is that since the error for the Social Security Number came on the part of the California Death Index, then it’s more likely that the CDI’s birth date for Kirby is also incorrect. Looks like there was some sloppy data entry here (not that I’ve ever done that before!).

All that said, the California Death Index is a great help and guide to obtaining original records. I’ve been able to sort out relationships and find more family members by using this resource. By putting this data on our family trees and then uploading my GEDCOM to RootsWeb’s WorldConnect, I’ve been contacted by many Midkiff descendants over the years and been able to verify the information as well as share with them their family history.

Research Log: MIDKIFFs in the 1920 Census

I spent some time this morning looking for John Franklin MIDKIFF, Jr. in 1920 U.S. Federal Census (it was his future wife and in-laws, the WESTABYs, that I recently discovered at long last, on the 1920 census). Since John was only an almost-ten-year-old boy, I searched mainly for his father, John Franklin MIDKIFF, Sr. The household should look like this:

John Franklin MIDKIFF – age 49, born Texas
Margie Ethel (TOLLIVER) MIDKIFF – age 32, born Nebraska
Edna Susan MIDKIFF (from John’s first marriage) – age 15, born Colorado
Ruth Ethel MIDKIFF – age 11, born Colorado
John Franklin MIDKIFF, Jr. – age 9, born Colorado
Dorothy Zada MIDKIFF – age 5, born Idaho

The family could also include any of the older married children, in-laws, and grandchildren of John, Sr. and his first wife, Ella Lydia WILLIS. They are:

Charles Nathaniel MIDKIFF, Sr. – age 25, born Oklahoma
Marie Marcella (WELLS) MIDKIFF – age 23, born Idaho
Charles Nathaniel MIDKIFF, Jr. – age 3, born Idaho
Edna Marie MIDKIFF – age 1 6/12, born Utah

Myrtle Mary (MIDKIFF) ARTER – age 22, born Oklahoma
James Montgomery ARTER – age c. 31, born Pennsylvania
Agusta Mary ARTER – age 4, born Idaho
possibly Jim-or James-ARTER – details unknown
possibly Edith ARTER – details unknown

Iva Ella (MIDKIFF) HURST – age 17, born Colorado
James L. HURST – age 22, born Nebraska
James N. HURST – age 3/12, born California

I started doing some simple searches on Ancestry.com, but did not get any matches to this family. I have lots more possibilities, but this is just a start. Below are the search terms I used and the subsequent results. I used my Online Research Log to keep track of my research.

john, midkiff, exact search; 45 hits, no matches

john, midkiff, soundex search, birthplace: texas; 3 hits, no matches

john, midkiff, soundex search, birth year: 1870 +/- 2 years; 12 hits, no matches

j, midkiff, exact search; 57 hits, no matches

j, midkiff, soundex search, birthplace: texas; 5 hits, no matches

j, midkiff, sounex search, birth year: 1870 +/- 2 years; 10 hits, no matches

john, exact search, birthplace: texas; birth year: 1870 +/- 2 years, father’s birthplace: tennessee, mother’s birthplace: illinois; 2 hits, no matches

j,exact search, birthplace: texas; birth year: 1870 +/- 2 years, father’s birthplace: tennessee, mother’s birthplace: illinois; 10 hits, no matches

[blank], exact search, birthplace: texas, birth year: 1870 +/- 2 years, residence: idaho; 106 hits, no matches

[blank], exact search, birthplace: texas, birth year: 1870 +/- 2 years, relationship: head; residence: washington; 150 hits, no matches

[blank], exact search, birthplace: texas, birth year: 1870 +/- 2 years, wife: margie; 18 hits, no matches

[blank], exact search, birthplace: texas, birth year: 1870 +/- 2 years, wife: marg*; 352 hits, no matches

I then went on to try various other children in this household:

dorothy, exact search, birthplace: idaho; birth year: 1914 +/- 2 years, father’s birthplace: texas, mother’s birthplace: nebraska; 1 hit, no match

john, exact search, birthplace: colorado, birth year: 1910 +/- 2 years, father’s birthplace: texas, mother’s birthplace: nebraska; 1 hit, no match

john, exact search, birthplace: colorado, birth year: 1910 +/- 2 years, residence: idaho; 17 hits, no matches

john, exact search, birthplace: colorado, birth year: 1910 +/- 2 years, residence: colorado; 90 hits, no matches

john, exact search, birth year: 1910 +/- 2 years, residence: butte county, california; 100 hits, no matches

j, exact search, birth year: 1910 +/- 2 years, residence: butte county, california; 100 hits, no matches

Theories:

1) This family is not on the census at all due to moving around the country (probably from Idaho and/or Utah to Northern California). However, given that it was winter, that probably doesn’t make sense.

2) They are on the census, but “Midkiff” is badly mangled in the index…or was written as METCALF(E), a different Soundex code.

3) They are living with other relatives, and I need to look for all adult children and siblings of John and/or his wife, Margie.