A Civil War Soldier: Cpl. Ethan Allen WESTBROOK (1837 – 1902)

How Related: Brother to my 4th-great-grandmother, Amanda (WESTBROOK) KIMBALL

Born: 29 March 1837 in Ohio (possibly in Chagrin Falls, Cuyahoga County)

Parents: Peter WESTBROOK (1797 – 1851) and Fannie MARBLE (1801 – 1849)

Siblings: Amanda (1816 – c. 1882); Ephraim (b. 1820); Benjamin (1822 – 1872); Henry H. (b. 1823); Solomon (1831 – 1831); William (1833 – c. 1833/4); and William Thomas WESTBROOK (b. 1840)

Married: 1st to Mary LOCKWOOD (dates unknown) c. 1858, probably in Kalamzoo Co., Michigan; married 2nd to Cinderella Jennie HERRINGTON (1843 – 1913) c. 1866, possibly in Dayton Twp., Newaygo Co., Michigan

Children: with wife Mary, he had one son: William Peter (b. 1860); with wife Cinderella, he had five children: Myron D. (1867 – 1869); James Walter (1869 – 1942); Amanda L. (1875 – 1943); Laura M. (b. 1876); and Mabel A. WESTBROOK (b. 1882)

Source: Civil War Pension Index Card of Ethan A. Westbrook. Organization Index to Pension Files of Veterans Who Served Between 1861 and 1900. National Archives and Records Administration. Publication T289. Digital image purchased at Footnote [http://www.footnote.com/].


Enlisted: 10 October 1851 in Pavillion Twp., Kalamazoo Co., Michigan; private. Enlisted in Co. E, 13th Michigan Infantry on 17 January 1862. Promoted to full corporal on 1 November 1864.

Side Served: Union

Discharged: 22 July 1865 at Detroit, Wayne Co., Michigan

Biography or Information of Interest: Named for Vermont’s Revolutionary War hero, Ethan Allen WESTBROOK was written up in a Newaygo County history of early pioneers, which can be read here.

Died: 19 April 1902 in Newaygo County, Michigan (probably on his farm in Lincoln Township)

Buried: Dayton Center (Jewell) Cemetery, Dayton Twp., Newaygo Co., Michigan

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A Civil War Soldier: Cpl. Ethan Allen WESTBROOK (1837 – 1902)

How Related: Brother to my 4th-great-grandmother, Amanda (WESTBROOK) KIMBALL

Born: 29 March 1837 in Ohio (possibly in Chagrin Falls, Cuyahoga County)

Parents: Peter WESTBROOK (1797 – 1851) and Fannie MARBLE (1801 – 1849)

Siblings: Amanda (1816 – c. 1882); Ephraim (b. 1820); Benjamin (1822 – 1872); Henry H. (b. 1823); Solomon (1831 – 1831); William (1833 – c. 1833/4); and William Thomas WESTBROOK (b. 1840)

Married: 1st to Mary LOCKWOOD (dates unknown) c. 1858, probably in Kalamzoo Co., Michigan; married 2nd to Cinderella Jennie HERRINGTON (1843 – 1913) c. 1866, possibly in Dayton Twp., Newaygo Co., Michigan

Children: with wife Mary, he had one son: William Peter (b. 1860); with wife Cinderella, he had five children: Myron D. (1867 – 1869); James Walter (1869 – 1942); Amanda L. (1875 – 1943); Laura M. (b. 1876); and Mabel A. WESTBROOK (b. 1882)

Source: Civil War Pension Index Card of Ethan A. Westbrook. Organization Index to Pension Files of Veterans Who Served Between 1861 and 1900. National Archives and Records Administration. Publication T289. Digital image purchased at Footnote [http://www.footnote.com/].


Enlisted: 10 October 1851 in Pavillion Twp., Kalamazoo Co., Michigan; private. Enlisted in Co. E, 13th Michigan Infantry on 17 January 1862. Promoted to full corporal on 1 November 1864.

Side Served: Union

Discharged: 22 July 1865 at Detroit, Wayne Co., Michigan

Biography or Information of Interest: Named for Vermont’s Revolutionary War hero, Ethan Allen WESTBROOK was written up in a Newaygo County history of early pioneers, which can be read here.

Died: 19 April 1902 in Newaygo County, Michigan (probably on his farm in Lincoln Township)

Buried: Dayton Center (Jewell) Cemetery, Dayton Twp., Newaygo Co., Michigan

A Civil War Soldier: Pvt. George W. VREELAND (c. 1841 – 1923)

How Related: Brother of my 3rd-great-grandmother, Elenor “Nellie” L. VREELAND

Born: c. 1841 in New Jersey, possibly in Montvale, Bergen County

Parents: John P. VREELAND (1799 – 1870) and Mary KANOUSE (c. 1804 – aft. 1870)

Siblings: John H. (b. c. 1830); Elizabeth (b. c. 1832); Sarah (b. c. 1834), Elenor “Nellie” L. (1835 – 1912) – my ancestor; Hartman (b. c. 1836); Mary E. (b. c. 1843); and Martha A. VREELAND (b. c. 1847)

Married: probably never married

Children: probably no children

Source: Civil War Pension Index Card of George W. Vreeland. Organization Index to Pension Files of Veterans Who Served Between 1861 and 1900. National Archives and Records Administration. Publication T289. Digital image purchased at Footnote [http://www.footnote.com/]

Enlisted: 7 August 1862 at Ann Arbor, Washtenaw Co., Michigan; private. Enlisted in Co. H, 20th Michigan Infantry on 19 August 1862.

Side Served: Union

Mustered Out: 30 May 1865 at Delaney House, Washington, D.C.

Source: Michigan Soldiers Home, Grand Rapids, Kent Co., Michigan. Postcard. 1915. Digital image accessed at Kent Co., Michigan GenWeb site [http://kent.migenweb.net/veterans/index.html] 26 May 2008.

Biography or Information of Interest: It’s taken me a while to post this sketch, because I’m just not sure about the details of George’s life. There are an amazing number of George W. Vreelands of the same age that lived in Michigan (even in Washtenaw County!) at the same time as “my” George. Sorting them out has been a challenge. I’ve used census records that lead me to believe George never married or had children (but I’m not 100% confident of this theory!). He lives as a single man at his parents’, and later his married sister’s, homes until 1910, when it appears he lived in the Veterans (Soldiers) Home in Grand Rapids, Kent Co., Michigan. He seems to have lived in the Veterans Home in Los Angeles Co., California after 1920.

Source: National (Sawtelle) Soldiers Home, Santa Monica, Los Angeles Co., California. Postcard. Date unknown. Digital image accessed at Los Angeles Co., California GenWeb site [http://www.cagenweb.com/re/losangeles/photos.htm] 26 May 2008.


Died: 3 April 1923, Sawtelle Soldiers Home, Los Angeles Co., California

Buried: Los Angeles (Sawtelle) National Cemetery, Los Angeles Co., California

A Civil War Soldier: Pvt. George W. VREELAND (c. 1841 – 1923)

How Related: Brother of my 3rd-great-grandmother, Elenor “Nellie” L. VREELAND

Born: c. 1841 in New Jersey, possibly in Montvale, Bergen County

Parents: John P. VREELAND (1799 – 1870) and Mary KANOUSE (c. 1804 – aft. 1870)

Siblings: John H. (b. c. 1830); Elizabeth (b. c. 1832); Sarah (b. c. 1834), Elenor “Nellie” L. (1835 – 1912) – my ancestor; Hartman (b. c. 1836); Mary E. (b. c. 1843); and Martha A. VREELAND (b. c. 1847)

Married: probably never married

Children: probably no children

Source: Civil War Pension Index Card of George W. Vreeland. Organization Index to Pension Files of Veterans Who Served Between 1861 and 1900. National Archives and Records Administration. Publication T289. Digital image purchased at Footnote [http://www.footnote.com/]

Enlisted: 7 August 1862 at Ann Arbor, Washtenaw Co., Michigan; private. Enlisted in Co. H, 20th Michigan Infantry on 19 August 1862.

Side Served: Union

Mustered Out: 30 May 1865 at Delaney House, Washington, D.C.

Source: Michigan Soldiers Home, Grand Rapids, Kent Co., Michigan. Postcard. 1915. Digital image accessed at Kent Co., Michigan GenWeb site [http://kent.migenweb.net/veterans/index.html] 26 May 2008.

Biography or Information of Interest: It’s taken me a while to post this sketch, because I’m just not sure about the details of George’s life. There are an amazing number of George W. Vreelands of the same age that lived in Michigan (even in Washtenaw County!) at the same time as “my” George. Sorting them out has been a challenge. I’ve used census records that lead me to believe George never married or had children (but I’m not 100% confident of this theory!). He lives as a single man at his parents’, and later his married sister’s, homes until 1910, when it appears he lived in the Veterans (Soldiers) Home in Grand Rapids, Kent Co., Michigan. He seems to have lived in the Veterans Home in Los Angeles Co., California after 1920.

Source: National (Sawtelle) Soldiers Home, Santa Monica, Los Angeles Co., California. Postcard. Date unknown. Digital image accessed at Los Angeles Co., California GenWeb site [http://www.cagenweb.com/re/losangeles/photos.htm] 26 May 2008.


Died: 3 April 1923, Sawtelle Soldiers Home, Los Angeles Co., California

Buried: Los Angeles (Sawtelle) National Cemetery, Los Angeles Co., California

Freebies and Special Offers

I sent out the following letter to my former Online Genealogy Class students, and thought I’d share these great freebies and special offers with my blog readers as well:

“I’m sorry I’m a little late with this news, but these offers apply through the end of the month, not just Memorial Day weekend. First of all Ancestry.com:

To commemorate the NARA-Ancestry.com agreement on the eve of Memorial Day, Ancestry.com is making its entire U.S. Military Collection — the largest online collection of American military records — available for free to the public. From May 20 through May 31, people can log on to http://www.ancestry.com/military to view more than 100 million names and 700 titles and databases of military records, the majority of which come from NARA, from all 50 U.S. states.

Ancestry is also offering a free download in .pdf format of the 79-page book Military Collections at Ancestry.com by Esther Yu Sumner. Not only does it discuss the various collections found on the website, but it gives a short, detailed history of each war or conflict in chronological order. Even if you don’t have an Ancestry subscription, this book is well worth reading. Click here to download.
—————————————

“Also, Footnote has a deal:

Lindon, UT May 22, 2008 – In commemoration of Memorial Day, Footnote.com today announced their entire collection of military photos will be made permanently free on the site. The collection features over 80,000 photos from WWII and Vietnam making it the largest collection of its kind on the web.

Through their partnership with the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), Footnote.com has digitized and indexed the photos, which include images of downed aircraft, aerial photos of bombings, fighter groups and combat photos. What makes the photos unique are the short captions included with the photos, which provide interesting details about the events and people featured. To view these photos click here.

The announcement follows closely behind Footnote.com’s recent release of an interactive version of the Vietnam War Memorial. The online memorial is one of the largest images on the web and features a full-size photo of the memorial in Washington, DC. Visitors to the interactive memorial can search for names of fallen veterans, connect with other people, and create tributes by adding their own photos and stories to the site. To view the Vietnam War Memorial, go to www.footnote.com/thewall/.

“Footnote has also added–or is starting to add–the following databases to its subscription area:

“City Directories for: Boston, Chicago, New York City, Philadelphia, and Washington DC. They have also added the 1860 Federal Census. “So what?” you say. “A lot of subscription websites have the 1860 Federal Census.” This is different. This one is interactive. In other words, let’s say you find your 3rd-great-grandfather on the 1860 census. You can leave an annotation on his record, and maybe another descendant of his will come along and find it when they search for his name. Voila! You’ve connected with another cousin and can exchange research! This is in the subscription area, only.

“Also, I saw some news that they are going to start adding the Civil War Pension Files (they already have the index cards online). You know, those records that cost $75 a piece to order from the National Archives? Isn’t this exciting?

“Don’t have a subscription to Footnote, yet? You can 1) go to your local Family History Center and use their free subscription, or 2) Footnote is offering a 20% discount to their annual subscription through affiliates (like myself) only. To take advantage of this offer, click on this link.

————————————————

FamilySearchLabs (the LDS Church) has added a number of images and indexes to its Record search area. You no longer have to go through the (free) registration process to access this information, and can start immediately with your search. Please be aware that this is a Lab (Beta) site, so some databases are incomplete (they’re still adding to them), some may be inaccessible temporarily, and some may not have complete images (I noticed this with the Michigan birth and death records…some have only the first page of a two-page record set. I e-mailed them and they replied saying they are still working on getting the second pages to load up). Here are the current databases they offer:

Censuses:

* 1850 U.S. Federal Census (population schedule), Mortality Schedule, and Slave Schedule
* 1855 Massachusetts State Census
* 1855 Wisconsin State Census
* 1860 U.S. Federal Census (population schedule)
* 1865 Massachusetts State Census
* 1870 Federal Census (population schedule)
* 1875 Wisconsin State Census
* 1880 U.S. Federal Census
* 1885 Wisconsin State Census
* 1895 Argentina National Census
* 1895 Wisconsin State Census
* 1900 U.S. Federal Census (population schedule)
* 1905 Wisconsin State Census
* 1930 Mexico National Census

Court Records:

* Maryland, Cecil County Probate Estate Files, 1851 – 1940
* England, Cheshire, Register of Electors 1842 – 1900
* Freedman Bank Records, 1865 – 1874

Land and Property:

* Vermont Land Records, Early to 1900

Migration:

* New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892 – 1924

Military:

* Civil War Pension Index Cards
* United States, WWII Draft Registration Cards, 1942

Vital Records:

* Cheshire, Church of England Burial Records, 1538 – 1907
* Cheshire, Church of England Christening Records, 1538 – 1907
* Cheshire, Church of England Marriage Records, 1538 – 1907
* Czech Republic, Litomerice Regional Archive Church Books, 1552 – 1905
* England, Diocese of Durham Bishops’ Transcripts, c. 1700 – 1900
* France, Coutances Catholic Diocese, 1802 – 1907
* Freedman’s Bureau, Virginia Marriages, c. 1815 – 1866
* Georgia Deaths, 1914 – 1947
* Germany Baptisms, 1700 – 1900
* Germany, Brandenburg and Posen, Civil Transcripts of Parish Registers, 1800 – 1875
* Germany Marriages, 1700 – 1900
* Illinois, Diocese of Belleville, Catholic Parish Records, 1729 – 1756
* Mexico Baptisms, 1700 – 1900
* Mexico Marriages, 1700 – 1900
* Michigan Births, 1867 – 1902
* Michigan Deaths, 1867 – 1897
* Michigan Marriages, 1867 – 1925
* Norway Baptisms, 1700 – 1900
* Norway Burials, 1700 – 1900
* Norway Marriages, 1700 – 1900
* Ohio Deaths, 1908 – 1953
* Ontario (Canada) Deaths, 1869 – 1947
* Pennsylvania, Philadelphia City Death Certificates, 1803 – 1915
* Spain, Albacete Diocese, Catholic Parish Records, 1550 – 1930
* Texas Death Index, 1964 – 1998
* Texas Deaths, 1890 – 1976
* United States Social Security Death Index (records start about 1965)
* Utah Death Certificates, 1904 – 1956
* Utah, Salt Lake County Death Records, 1908 – 1949
* Virginia, Fluvanna County Colbert Funeral Home Records, 1929 – 1976
* Washington (State) Death Certificates, 1907 – 1960
* West Virginia Births, 1853 – 1930
* West Virginia Deaths, 1853 – 1970
* West Virginia Marriages, 1853 – 1970″

Freebies and Special Offers

I sent out the following letter to my former Online Genealogy Class students, and thought I’d share these great freebies and special offers with my blog readers as well:

“I’m sorry I’m a little late with this news, but these offers apply through the end of the month, not just Memorial Day weekend. First of all Ancestry.com:

To commemorate the NARA-Ancestry.com agreement on the eve of Memorial Day, Ancestry.com is making its entire U.S. Military Collection — the largest online collection of American military records — available for free to the public. From May 20 through May 31, people can log on to http://www.ancestry.com/military to view more than 100 million names and 700 titles and databases of military records, the majority of which come from NARA, from all 50 U.S. states.

Ancestry is also offering a free download in .pdf format of the 79-page book Military Collections at Ancestry.com by Esther Yu Sumner. Not only does it discuss the various collections found on the website, but it gives a short, detailed history of each war or conflict in chronological order. Even if you don’t have an Ancestry subscription, this book is well worth reading. Click here to download.
—————————————

“Also, Footnote has a deal:

Lindon, UT May 22, 2008 – In commemoration of Memorial Day, Footnote.com today announced their entire collection of military photos will be made permanently free on the site. The collection features over 80,000 photos from WWII and Vietnam making it the largest collection of its kind on the web.

Through their partnership with the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), Footnote.com has digitized and indexed the photos, which include images of downed aircraft, aerial photos of bombings, fighter groups and combat photos. What makes the photos unique are the short captions included with the photos, which provide interesting details about the events and people featured. To view these photos click here.

The announcement follows closely behind Footnote.com’s recent release of an interactive version of the Vietnam War Memorial. The online memorial is one of the largest images on the web and features a full-size photo of the memorial in Washington, DC. Visitors to the interactive memorial can search for names of fallen veterans, connect with other people, and create tributes by adding their own photos and stories to the site. To view the Vietnam War Memorial, go to www.footnote.com/thewall/.

“Footnote has also added–or is starting to add–the following databases to its subscription area:

“City Directories for: Boston, Chicago, New York City, Philadelphia, and Washington DC. They have also added the 1860 Federal Census. “So what?” you say. “A lot of subscription websites have the 1860 Federal Census.” This is different. This one is interactive. In other words, let’s say you find your 3rd-great-grandfather on the 1860 census. You can leave an annotation on his record, and maybe another descendant of his will come along and find it when they search for his name. Voila! You’ve connected with another cousin and can exchange research! This is in the subscription area, only.

“Also, I saw some news that they are going to start adding the Civil War Pension Files (they already have the index cards online). You know, those records that cost $75 a piece to order from the National Archives? Isn’t this exciting?

“Don’t have a subscription to Footnote, yet? You can 1) go to your local Family History Center and use their free subscription, or 2) Footnote is offering a 20% discount to their annual subscription through affiliates (like myself) only. To take advantage of this offer, click on this link.

————————————————

FamilySearchLabs (the LDS Church) has added a number of images and indexes to its Record search area. You no longer have to go through the (free) registration process to access this information, and can start immediately with your search. Please be aware that this is a Lab (Beta) site, so some databases are incomplete (they’re still adding to them), some may be inaccessible temporarily, and some may not have complete images (I noticed this with the Michigan birth and death records…some have only the first page of a two-page record set. I e-mailed them and they replied saying they are still working on getting the second pages to load up). Here are the current databases they offer:

Censuses:

* 1850 U.S. Federal Census (population schedule), Mortality Schedule, and Slave Schedule
* 1855 Massachusetts State Census
* 1855 Wisconsin State Census
* 1860 U.S. Federal Census (population schedule)
* 1865 Massachusetts State Census
* 1870 Federal Census (population schedule)
* 1875 Wisconsin State Census
* 1880 U.S. Federal Census
* 1885 Wisconsin State Census
* 1895 Argentina National Census
* 1895 Wisconsin State Census
* 1900 U.S. Federal Census (population schedule)
* 1905 Wisconsin State Census
* 1930 Mexico National Census

Court Records:

* Maryland, Cecil County Probate Estate Files, 1851 – 1940
* England, Cheshire, Register of Electors 1842 – 1900
* Freedman Bank Records, 1865 – 1874

Land and Property:

* Vermont Land Records, Early to 1900

Migration:

* New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892 – 1924

Military:

* Civil War Pension Index Cards
* United States, WWII Draft Registration Cards, 1942

Vital Records:

* Cheshire, Church of England Burial Records, 1538 – 1907
* Cheshire, Church of England Christening Records, 1538 – 1907
* Cheshire, Church of England Marriage Records, 1538 – 1907
* Czech Republic, Litomerice Regional Archive Church Books, 1552 – 1905
* England, Diocese of Durham Bishops’ Transcripts, c. 1700 – 1900
* France, Coutances Catholic Diocese, 1802 – 1907
* Freedman’s Bureau, Virginia Marriages, c. 1815 – 1866
* Georgia Deaths, 1914 – 1947
* Germany Baptisms, 1700 – 1900
* Germany, Brandenburg and Posen, Civil Transcripts of Parish Registers, 1800 – 1875
* Germany Marriages, 1700 – 1900
* Illinois, Diocese of Belleville, Catholic Parish Records, 1729 – 1756
* Mexico Baptisms, 1700 – 1900
* Mexico Marriages, 1700 – 1900
* Michigan Births, 1867 – 1902
* Michigan Deaths, 1867 – 1897
* Michigan Marriages, 1867 – 1925
* Norway Baptisms, 1700 – 1900
* Norway Burials, 1700 – 1900
* Norway Marriages, 1700 – 1900
* Ohio Deaths, 1908 – 1953
* Ontario (Canada) Deaths, 1869 – 1947
* Pennsylvania, Philadelphia City Death Certificates, 1803 – 1915
* Spain, Albacete Diocese, Catholic Parish Records, 1550 – 1930
* Texas Death Index, 1964 – 1998
* Texas Deaths, 1890 – 1976
* United States Social Security Death Index (records start about 1965)
* Utah Death Certificates, 1904 – 1956
* Utah, Salt Lake County Death Records, 1908 – 1949
* Virginia, Fluvanna County Colbert Funeral Home Records, 1929 – 1976
* Washington (State) Death Certificates, 1907 – 1960
* West Virginia Births, 1853 – 1930
* West Virginia Deaths, 1853 – 1970
* West Virginia Marriages, 1853 – 1970″

A Civil War Soldier: Pvt. Jacob F. TOLIVER (1831 – 1898)

Source: Signature of Jacob F. Toliver from Compiled Service Record of Jacob F. Toliver. Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of North Carolina. National Archives and Records Administration. Publication M270. Digital image purchased at Footnote [http://www.footnote.com/].


How Related:
My husband’s 3rd-great-grandfather

Born: 17 February 1831 in Alleghany Co., North Carolina

Parents: Starling TOLIVER (1806 – aft 1870) and Mildred Ann SPURLIN (c. 1812 – aft 1870)

Siblings: Jacob was the eldest of nine children:

  • Calvin (1832 – 1931)
  • Frances (b. 1834)
  • Andrew (b. 1840)
  • Solomon (b. 1842)
  • Mary (1846 – 1914)
  • John (1848 – 1941)
  • Margaret (1851 – 1909)
  • and Rosa Ann TOLIVER (1853 – 1938)


Married: first to Matilda HIGGINS (1829 – 1906)–my husband’s ancestor–on 1 October 1851 in Ashe Co., North Carolina; divorced. Married second to Caroline CHEEK (1849 – 1927) on 4 April 1882, probably in Allegheny Co., North Carolina.

Children: with wife Matilda, Jacob had five children: Amanda Phidella (1853 – 1918); Rose Phidella (1857 – 1919); Clark Pleasant R. (1861 – 1918) – my husband’s ancestor; Solomon (1864 – 1950); and John Huston TOLLIVER (1867 – 1949). With wife Caroline, he had one son, Clayton TOLLIVER (1884 – 1952). During his children’s generation, another “L” was added to the surname, originally spelled TALIAFERRO.

Compiled Service Record Jacket of Jacob F. Toliver. Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of North Carolina. National Archives and Records Administration. Publication M270. Digital image purchased at Footnote [http://www.footnote.com/].

Enlisted: 15 September 1861 in Co. K (“Alleghany Tigers”), 37th North Carolina Infantry at Alleghany Co., North Carolina; private. Promoted to Full Private (Reduced to rank; Estimated day) on 30 March 1863.

Side Served: Confederacy

Discharged: Absent without leave on 28 January 1865.

Biography or Information of Interest: Jacob’s compiled service record consisted of 23 images at Footnote, plus a couple of cross-reference cards. The reason it is so long was his “interesting” career in the military, which began15 September 1861, when he first enlisted as a private in Company K (also known as the “Alleghany Tigers”) of the 137th North Carolina Infantry in the Confederate Army. His compiled service record contained a brief description (five foot, six inches tall; 30 years old) and his signature. On November 20th of that year, he mustered in at Camp Fisher, promising to serve for one year. On the January/February 1862 Muster Roll, he was listed as a drummer, although his record states he was not promoted to Full Musician until March 1st, and then promoted again to Full Musician on March 30th. On April 3rd, he re-enlisted for the duration of the war, at Kinston, Lenoir Co., North Carolina. Less than a month later, he was listed as a deserter, having taken off from Kinston on May 2nd. For eight long months, he remained away from his company. On 9 January 1864 at Liberty Mills (Virginia?) he returned to his unit. I don’t have his full military record, so I don’t know if he received a court martial for his offense, but I can’t imagine that he got away without some sort of consequence!

He served with his unit until he was captured by the Union Army on May 6, 1864 during the Battle of the Wilderness in Spotsylvania Co., Virginia. He ended up a prisoner of war at Point Lookout, Saint Mary’s Co., Maryland, arriving there May 17th from Belle Plains, Virginia. On July 23rd, he was transferred to Elmira Prison in Elmira, Chemung Co., New York, where he remained a prisoner until he was transferred for exchange on October 11th. On 15 November 1864, Jacob and 3,022 other Confederate POWs, including four citizens, four surgeons, and 74 officers, were exchanged at the Federal battery at Venus Point along the Savannah River in Georgia.

Apparently, all that was not adventure enough for Jacob, or perhaps he thought he had had enough of war. On 28 January 1865, he was reported as absent without leave from his company, and evidently never returned before the war ended on April 9th.

Died: 22 July 1898, probably in Allegheny Co., North Carolina, although it is possible that he removed to Battle Creek, Madison Co., Nebraska in the mid-1880s with some of his adult children.

Buried: unknown