The 13th Edition of the Carnival of Central and Eastern European Genealogy is Posted

Elizabeth of Little Bytes of Life posted the 13th Edition of the Carnival of Central and Eastern European Genealogy on Thanksgiving Day. The topic–not limited to those of Central or Eastern European heritage–was “What Resources are You Thankful For in Your Genealogical Research?”

There were ten submissions with gratitude expressed ranging from Polish resources to local genealogical societies to the Internet to family members. My own submission, “I’m Thankful for These Genealogy Resources,” is located here.

Elizabeth did a great job as first-time carnival hostess! The 14th Edition’s topic will be “Christmas Traditions of Central and Eastern Europe” and will be hosted by Jessica Oswalt back at the carnival’s home blog, Jessica’s Genejournal. Participants do not have to have Central or Eastern European ancestry to participate. Submissions are due on December 21st, and the Carnival will be posted on December 23rd.

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I’m Thankful for These Genealogy Resources

The topic for the 13th Edition of the Carnival of Central and Eastern European Genealogy is “What Research Resources are You Thankful For?” Submitters need not have Central or Eastern European ancestry to participate. While I will not be sharing specific resources–such as books or websites–or tips, I would like to highlight four assets that have enriched my research life and brought me unexpected resources and treasures.

My local genealogical society – the Eastern Washington Genealogical Society is a research resource unto itself…a living, breathing resource. If I get stuck on a problem, or need to know where to look, or if someone comes to me with a question I can’t answer, then I go to my fellow members at EWGS. Many of them are people who’ve been doing research longer than I have been alive…the hard way: in dusty repositories, by snail mail, and through cranking through thousands of rolls of microfilm. They know what puzzling legal jargon or Latin terms mean, or whether something significant is meant by missing information in a document. Furthermore, our society librarians and historian know where to find just about anything hiding in Spokane County, whether it’s in the courthouse vault or in an index in an obscure book in the genealogical collection of the public library. My life is enriched by these warm, caring people, and I can’t imagine a finer society anywhere!

The Family History Library and Family History Centers – Imagine doing research without the existence of the Family History Library in Salt Lake City or its branch libraries, the Family History Centers (wouldn’t it be awful!) The LDS Church takes seriously its mission to provide resources through the FHL and FHCs, and considers this a way of blessing the inhabitants of the globe. I couldn’t agree more! For people like myself who live far from our ancestral locations, obtaining records via microfilm at a Center or being able to visit the Library is a wonderful experience. I frequent my North Spokane Stake FHC so often that I am on a first-name basis with many of the volunteers and consider the director a personal friend. We share our research successes and challenges and always look forward to the newest wonder available through FamilySearch…like the Record Search pilot site. I receive the gift of hope whenever I research at my local FHC…hope that the records I order and view will provide the next piece of evidence for which I’ve long been looking!

The Internet – It’s so wonderful to be living in this time in history! Thirty years ago as a little girl–or even 15 years ago–I could not imagine the daily wonders I discover online. And to the people behind it all, whether volunteers or paid employees working to provide research lookups, transcribe data to a genealogical subscription site, scan images of books to be viewed online, or use their amazing intelligence and gifts to create wonders like the many faces of Google, I’m tremendously grateful that I am able to access all this information and knowledge!

My family – I’ve been honored and privileged to be recognized as the family historian and archivist, a responsibility I take seriously. Entrusted by family members with the care of photographs, documents, and mementos from the past, I strive to take measures to preserve and catalog them to the best of my ability so that future generations will know, memorialize, and understand those Who Came Before. I’ve been touched that my family blesses me with these dear treasures!

As a family historian and genealogist, for what are you thankful?

Carnivals Galore!

It’s that time of year! The nights are cooling off, and the days are mild and pleasant. Leaves are beginning to turn, and mums are blooming in gardens. It’s the perfect time to take a break from raking leaves and pine cones or cleaning gutters and enjoy a favorite virtual magazine or two. In the past few days, three carnivals have been posted, providing us with a plethora of enjoyable and pleasant reading for the weekend!


poster courtesy of footnoteMaven

The 1st Edition of the Canadian Genealogy Carnival was published on Wednesday at Kathryn Lake Hogan’s Looking4Ancestors. “My Ancestor Was Canadian, Eh!” was the topic, and nine ladies submitted eleven posts describing their Canadian ancestors. Mine was a mini-series, with two posts describing my own Canadian heritage, and one describing my husband’s. I know I’m repeating myself here, but I’m so excited to see the genesis of this carnival, because my focus this past year has been to learn more about and break down walls of my Canadian ancestors! This carnival will allow me to network with and learn from my fellow researchers from the land up north.

The topic for the next edition of the Canadian Genealogy Carnival is “My Famous Canadian Ancestor”. Was your ancestor a famous Canadian hockey player, actor or politician? Tell us about famous Canadians in your family. Don’t have a famous Canadian ancestor in your family tree? Not to worry; choose a famous Canadian you admire and share why you would like to have this person as your ancestor. Deadline for submissions is December 7, 2008. Submit your blog article using the carnival submission form.

Steve Danko hosted the 11th Edition of the Carnival of Central and Eastern European Genealogy at his blog, Steve’s Genealogy Blog, also published on Wednesday. Eight participants wrote about the given names of their ancestors: naming patterns, nicknames, saint names, and name changes. I’ve always been fascinated by the way Eastern European names variate, with one name having the possibility of a dozen (or more) nicknames! Even if you’re like myself, without much or any heritage from this corner of Europe, you’ll enjoy the interesting articles submitted to this carnival.

Jessica Oswalt of Jessica’s Genejournal will host the 12th Edition of the Carnival of Central and Eastern Genealogy, and has put out the call for submissions. The topic will be folklore, myths, legends and ghost stories, traditions or festivals of the countries in Central and Eastern Europe. The submissions do not necessarily have to be a part of your family tradition; it could be a submission on a historical event or it could just have been a part of the culture of your ancestor. The deadline for submissions is October 29. You can submit your articles here.

On Thursday, Lisa of Small-Leaved Shamrock posted the 8th Edition of the Carnival of Irish Heritage & Culture. It was the “Back to School” edition, with nine bloggers submitting their Irish genealogy research goals and cultural and heritage education plans for the coming school year. Three additional submissions on Irish heritage were also included. Celtic roots or not, you’ll be inspired by the ideas submitted here; perhaps you’ll read something that will help you in your own research goals.

The 9th Edition of the Carnival of Irish Heritage & Culture will be hosted by Bill West of West in New England:

Halloween (or Samhain as it was known among the ancient Celts) is approaching and what better time to tell us about your family’s Irish superstitions? Perhaps you have stories about strange coincidences and events that might have been passed down by your Irish relatives, or even know of some favorite legend or haunted place in Ireland. Share them with us in the next edition of the Carnival of Irish Heritage & Culture.

Deadline for submissions for the Irish Superstitions edition of the Carnival of Irish Heritage & Culture is October 25th.

Aren’t these great? I hope that you’ll take the time this weekend to browse through these virtual publications and consider submitting a post to at least one of these fascinating genealogical writing challenges! I’m sure that, like myself, you’ll discover a blog or two that’s new to you and add it to your favorites or your feed reader. Congratulations to submitters and hosts alike for providing a wealth of information, heritage, and quality writing for so many to enjoy!

September Is…

Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15 – October 15)

September 1: Labor Day (United States)
Labour Day (Canada)
(“Labor Day and Ancestral Occupations” by Carolyn L. Barkley)

September 1: Ramadan begins

September 7: National Grandparents’ Day (U.S. and Canada)
Father’s Day (Australia and New Zealand)

September 11: Patriot Day (United States)

September 15: Independence Day
(Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua)

September 16: Independence Day (Mexico)

September 19: Independence Day (Saint Kitts and Nevis)

September 22: Autumnal Equinox (Northern Hemisphere)
Vernal Equinox (Southern Hemisphere)

September 29, sunset: Rosh Hashanah (Jewish New Year)

Do any of the above events feature in or affect your heritage, culture, or family history?

September Carnivals and Events:

September 1 – Data Backup Day

It’s Data Backup Day
by Thomas MacEntee of Destination: Austin Family

Don’t Be Blogged Gone: Tips for Keeping Your Blog Backed Up and Secure
by Elizabeth O’Neal of Little Bytes of Life

Scanfest: Sunday, September 28th, 11 AM – 2 PM, Pacific Daylight Time

Go here to learn how to join Scanfest and our group of chatting, scanning family archivists, historians, and bloggers!

Go here to add the above deadlines and dates to your Google Calendar,
courtesy of Thomas MacEntee of Destination: Austin Family.

The 10th Edition of the Carnival of Central and Eastern European Genealogy is Posted

Jessica Oswalt of Jessica’s Genejournal has just posted the 10th Edition of the Carnival of Central and Eastern European Genealogy. The theme for this carnival was a carousel one (choose your own topic), and there were five submissions by five bloggers. Congratulations to Jessica on this milestone edition! Ten carnivals are really quite an achievement, and I know sometimes it’s been difficult to get submitters, mainly–I believe–because of what is perceived to be a limited scope of ancestry about which to blog. I’d like to remind my readers that Central and Eastern Europe covers a large variety of countries, cultures, and ethnicities, so consider writing a post and submitting it for a future carnival. I’ve participated in the past, even though I have no Eastern European heritage and very little Central European ancestry (just a drop of German in these veins!). Be sure to drop by and read the carnival posts and–oh, yes–say “Happy Birthday!” to Jessica while you’re at it!

[The 11th] edition will be hosted by Steve Danko. The topic, as suggested by him, will be on: “First (Given) Names: Did any of your ancestors have an unusual given name? Have you discovered the meanings behind the given names of your ancestors? Did your ancestors use any naming patterns for their children? Are there any given names that are particular common in your family history? Did any of your ancestors have given names that you particularly like or dislike? Does your family celebrate “Name Days”? Did your immigrant ancestors change their given names after they arrived in America? Tell us about the first (given) names in your family. You can concentrate on one name, a few names, or you can go wild and write about the first names of all your ancestors!” Submissions for the next edition are due on September 21, and the edition will be posted on September 24. You can submit your article here.

August Is…

…National Back to School Month (United States).

…Holiday Month (many European countries).

August 1: Anniversary of the 1st U.S. Federal Census
Swiss National Day

August 2 – 3: Twins Day in Twinsburg, Ohio
(Do twins run in your family?)

August 6: National Salvadoran-American Day (United States)

August 7: Purple Heart Day

August 8 – 24: 2008 Summer Olympics, Beijing, China
(Any Olympians or athletic champions in your family tree?)

August 9: Singapore Independence Day

August 10: Ecuador Independence Day

August 14: Pakistan Independence Day

August 15: Korea Independence Day
India Independence Day

August 17: Indonesia Independence Day

August 21: Hawaii Statehood Day

August 25: Uruguay Independence Day

August 31: Malaysia Independence Day

Do any of the above events feature in or affect your heritage, culture, or family history?

Carnival Deadlines:

August 1 – 53rd Edition of the Carnival of Genealogy – Carousel Edition

August 4 – 10th Edition of the Carnival of Central and European Genealogy – Carousel Edition

August 10 – 4th Edition of the “I Smile for the Camera” Carnival – My Favorite Photograph

August 15 – 54th Edition of the Carnival of Genealogy – topic to be announced

Submissions for the 8th Edition of the Carnival of Irish Heritage and Culture are not due until September 22. Read more here.

The Cabinet of Curiosities is on summer holiday until September. Tim Abbott is looking for hosts for future editions.

August 1 – Data Backup Day

Julie Miller writes on how to create a genealogy disaster plan.

Scanfest: Sunday, August 24th, 11 AM – 2 PM, Pacific Daylight Time

Scanfest will be held one week early (usually held the last Sunday of the month), due to August 31st being a part of Labor Day weekend.

Go here to learn how to join Scanfest and our group of chatting, scanning family archivists, historians, and bloggers!

Go here to add the above deadlines and dates to your Google Calendar, courtesy of Thomas MacEntee of Destination: Austin Family.

It’s Carnival Time!


Two carnivals were posted today. The first was the 9th Edition of the Carnival of Central and Eastern European Genealogy, whose topic was “Research Experiences and Techniques.” Jessica Oswalt has hosted this carnival at her blog, Jessica’s Genejournal. There were seven submissions by five bloggers, including a first time carnival submitter. (I was not a participant this time.)

poster courtesy of footnoteMaven

The other carnival was the 52nd Edition of the Carnival of Genealogy, whose topic was “Age.” Lisa of 100 Years in America hosted this edition, which had 29 submissions by 28 bloggers. My post, “What’s Age Got to Do with It?”, can be found here; but alas! apparently I was so excited about getting my post finished a day ahead of the due date (instead of the day of, as usual for me), that I forgot to submit it in time. Oh, well! Lisa was so kind to squeeze in my entry! By the way, “well done” to both Lisa and Jessica for all the work they did on their respective carnivals!

The topics for both of these next carnivals will be a Carousel Theme, which means the bloggers may pick their own topic. The due date for the 10th Edition of Carnival of Central and European Genealogy is August 4th; submissions can be entered here. The due date for the 53rd Edition of the Carnival of Genealogy will be August 1 and you can enter your articles here.

Now go enjoy some great reading!