Friday Findings: GenLine, CRAPSEY Burials, Cousins, and SNOOK Graves

Due to the Blogger debacle this week, I was not able to post my Friday Findings in a timely manner. Here’s a rundown of my research results for the week of July 26 – August 1, 2008:

More on Many Marriages
While entering the marriage records of my husband’s granduncle, Lee Joseph “Mick” MARTIN, I realized that the witnesses for his third marriage, to Martha Isabell (JONES) DVORAK, were his daughter from his first marriage and her husband. Hmm… It made me wonder if his first wife had died by then (I’m not sure how their marriage ended; by divorce or by her death?). I couldn’t find any death information for her, but I did find Isabell, as she was called, on the SSDI.

Swedish Parish Records
Also following up on last week’s findings, I went to my local Family History Center to use their free subscription to GenLine, the Swedish parish records database, to find and verify my great-great-grandmother’s birth (Ida Charlotte (GUSTAVSON) HOLST). I had never used it before, so it took some time. Fortunately, it has a nice tutorial, available both in English and Swedish. It is necessary to know the name of the parish to do a search. The records appear in digital image format, not unlike looking at a roll of microfilm. They are not indexed by name in any way, so it takes some searching. All I had for Ida’s birthplace was Hamnada, Sweden. I had no idea where this location was, and used both Wikipedia and the FamilySearch Library Catalog to find it, without any success. I had a feeling I was spelling it incorrectly. I then did a Google search and found a mention in someone’s online family tree of a “HamnadaSmåland, Krnberg“. I went back to Wikipedia to look at the political structure of Sweden. Småland is one of 25 provinces (landskapen) of Sweden and has no political structure as of 1634. It is a cultural, geographical and historical subdivision. Kronoberg is a county (län), a political subdivision, that lies in what is a part of Småland. I still could not find Hamnada or a a similiar name in any of the lists of municipalities (similar to American townships), villages, or cities of Sweden.

I went back to GenLine, and looking up Kronoberg County records, I noticed that Hamneda was one of the parishes. Bingo! They had birth and christening records up through 1861 (I don’t recall the beginning year), so I went to take a look. In 1861 alone, there were NINE Ida Charlottas (no Charlottes) born in Hamneda parish! Only one had a surname close to GUSTAVSON, and that was a Ida Charlotta GUSTAFSON born, it appears on 29 December 1861 and baptized 31 December 1861. I say “appears”, because I am not certain of what the dates stand for. There are three numbers and a month before each record. The first number is the record number, as they are all in sequence from 1 until the last record. Then comes the month abbreviation, which is very similar to our English month abbreviations. Then two numbers follow. The first number is always lower than the second number, and none of the numbers go beyond 31, so my assumption is that the first one is the birth date and the second one is the christening date. The words “Births and Baptisms” appear at the the top of each of these pages (in Swedish, of course), adding credence to my theory. I used FamilySearch’s online Swedish Genealogical Word List to figure out the words.

My Ida Charlotte GUSTAVSON was born 28 October 1861, but I need to find my source of information for that. Her 1900 U. S. Federal Census enumeration does have October 1861 as a birth date. I ran out of time to double check 1860 records, and there are none available at GenLine for 1862. I will need to search other nearby parish records, too, I think. I also did not have time to figure out how to save or print the image with the birth date of the Ida Charlotta GUSTAFSON I found. This was an interesting first foray into Swedish records, and I felt I learned quite a bit.

CRAPSEY Burials
I’ve been trying to find a death date for my 4th-great-grandmother, Lura Ann (JACKSON) PECK CRAPSEY. I know she was deceased by 1900, when my step-ancestor, the Rev. John CRAPSEY, Jr. was listed as a widower in the Federal Census for that year. She was alive as late as 1891, when her husband filed an application for a pension based on his deceased son’s military service. They were living St. Paul, Ramsey Co., Minnesota. Attempts to have a volunteer at RAOGK look up her death records did not work out. I then came across John’s obituary stating he was buried in Forest Lawn Cemetery. There is a Forest Lawn Memorial Parks and Mortuaries in Ramsey County, and I contacted them to see if I could find burial information (and thus a death date) for the Crapseys. I received an immediate response that there was no record of either one in their records. I need to follow up with wording from John’s obituary to make sure that the Forest Lawn Cemetery he was buried in is the same as what Park and Mortuaries company now manages, when their records begin, and if they have record of John and Lura’s children being buried there (it’s possible, if their children are buried there, that John and Lura are buried without markers).

Cousins
A distant LEWIS cousin of mine, Bob Stefanich, contacted me to tell me about another cousin of ours (related more closely to me than Bob is) and that the LEWIS family reunion is occurring today in Fruitport, Muskegon Co., Michigan (wish I could be there)! I’ve contacted Jim with the hope that I can get more information on the grandchildren and great-grandchildren of my 2nd-great-grandparents, George Emmett LEWIS and Mary WILKINSON.

Also, a McARTHUR cousin contacted me. She lives in Michigan and is able to visit the ancestral cemeteries. She promised to take some tombstone photos of some of our mutual ancestors…so exciting!

SNOOK Graves
Speaking of ancestral graves, I heard from a Find A Grave photo volunteer–Catherine Bryon–who photographed the graves of my husband’s 3rd-great-grandfather, Reuben Wohlford SNOOK, and his second wife, Elizabeth NEARHOOD, at the Forsyth Cemetery in Rosebud Co., Montana. Click on the links to view the photographs. Thanks, Catherine!

The CHAPLIN – MARTIN Marriage Certificate


Source: Chaplin – Martin Certificate of Marriage. Washington. Clark County. Marriage Certificates 1889 – 1977. Digital image. Washington State Digitial Archives. http://www.digitalarchives.wa.gov/ : 2008.

Yes, I realize that Wordless Wednesday is supposed to be about displaying a photograph, not a document. Inspired by George Geder’s posts of posting ancestral photos on Wednesday and then a biographical sketch on Thursdays, I started doing WW back in February, based on a pattern of showing ancestral photos from my father-in-law’s, father’s, mother-in-law’s, and mother’s family trees, in that order. The problem was, I don’t have access to many photos from my mother-in-law’s family, and I don’t believe she does, either. Unless I can come in contact with some of her relatives and obtain scans of ancestral photos (if there are any), I’m relegated to displaying photos of tombstones and images of documents. So be it!

I did want to feature this document, however, for a variety of reasons. My husband’s family (both parents’ sides) has lived in this state since the early 1900s, and Washington State has a wonderful open-record policy, perhaps one of the best in the nation. In addition, the Washington State Digital Archives and FamilySearch Labs are featuring both indexes and images of county, state, and federal records for Washington residents. I’m waiting impatiently for FamilySearch to release the images that have been indexed on their pilot site, and decided to help them along by doing some indexing on that specific collection. That in itself has been a lot of fun…to see records from Stevens County (where my parents live), Spokane County (my residence), and Klickatat County (which we pass through on the way to visit my in-laws). I recognize all these little towns which certainly helps in determining messy handwritten locations on death certificates!

Besides featuring a document with personal sentiment from the fabulous digital archives site, I thought this record was unique because it contains the signatures of four my husband’s direct ancestors. John Franklin and Angelia Rebecca (LUKE) MARTIN were Leona Mary MARTIN’s parents. Forest “Frank” L. CHAPLIN and Leona were my mother-in-law’s parents. I’ve always seen Forest’s name spelled with two Rs, but here he signs it with one. Hmm… I had the privilege of meeting the widowed Leona once–at our wedding–and then attended her funeral in 1993. I’ve mentioned Leona and her twin brother Lee before in one of my earlier Wordless Wednesdays.

The CHAPLIN – MARTIN Marriage Certificate


Source: Chaplin – Martin Certificate of Marriage. Washington. Clark County. Marriage Certificates 1889 – 1977. Digital image. Washington State Digitial Archives. http://www.digitalarchives.wa.gov/ : 2008.

Yes, I realize that Wordless Wednesday is supposed to be about displaying a photograph, not a document. Inspired by George Geder’s posts of posting ancestral photos on Wednesday and then a biographical sketch on Thursdays, I started doing WW back in February, based on a pattern of showing ancestral photos from my father-in-law’s, father’s, mother-in-law’s, and mother’s family trees, in that order. The problem was, I don’t have access to many photos from my mother-in-law’s family, and I don’t believe she does, either. Unless I can come in contact with some of her relatives and obtain scans of ancestral photos (if there are any), I’m relegated to displaying photos of tombstones and images of documents. So be it!

I did want to feature this document, however, for a variety of reasons. My husband’s family (both parents’ sides) has lived in this state since the early 1900s, and Washington State has a wonderful open-record policy, perhaps one of the best in the nation. In addition, the Washington State Digital Archives and FamilySearch Labs are featuring both indexes and images of county, state, and federal records for Washington residents. I’m waiting impatiently for FamilySearch to release the images that have been indexed on their pilot site, and decided to help them along by doing some indexing on that specific collection. That in itself has been a lot of fun…to see records from Stevens County (where my parents live), Spokane County (my residence), and Klickatat County (which we pass through on the way to visit my in-laws). I recognize all these little towns which certainly helps in determining messy handwritten locations on death certificates!

Besides featuring a document with personal sentiment from the fabulous digital archives site, I thought this record was unique because it contains the signatures of four my husband’s direct ancestors. John Franklin and Angelia Rebecca (LUKE) MARTIN were Leona Mary MARTIN’s parents. Forest “Frank” L. CHAPLIN and Leona were my mother-in-law’s parents. I’ve always seen Forest’s name spelled with two Rs, but here he signs it with one. Hmm… I had the privilege of meeting the widowed Leona once–at our wedding–and then attended her funeral in 1993. I’ve mentioned Leona and her twin brother Lee before in one of my earlier Wordless Wednesdays.

Emma Alice (LYTON) CHAPLIN and Great-grandchildren

Source: Chaplin, Emma Alice Lyton with great-grandchildren. Photograph. C. late 1957 – early 1958. Original photograph in the possession of Alice Chaplin Midkiff. Vancouver, Washington. 2008.

This is one of only two photographs that I know about of Emma Alice (LYTON) CHAPLIN, my mother-in-law’s paternal grandmother. In this photograph, she is holding three of four great-grandchildren that were born to my mother-in-law and her two siblings in the spring of 1957. The three great-grandchildren are my husband, Norman Jon MIDIFF, and his twin girl cousins [names withheld for privacy] born to his maternal aunt and her husband. His maternal uncle and his wife also had a son born that same year, but they lived in California and were not able to attend this visit. At the same time, a four-generation photo was taken:

Source: Four-generations of the Lyton-Chaplin Family. Photograph. C. late 1957 – early 1958. Original photograph in the possession of Alice Chaplin Midkiff. Vancouver, Washington. 2008.

In the front row, left to right are my husband’s maternal grandfather, Forrest L. “Frank” CHAPLIN and his mother, Emma. I believe my husband, Norm, is sitting in his grandfather’s lap. In the back row are my mother-in-law and her sister.

Emma Alice LYTON was born 31 March 1874 in Thurmon, Fremont Co., Iowa to Mariah Emily (DAILEY) LYTON. Her father, Henry LYTON, had died the month previously. Henry was actually George TURK, born in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, who had come to the United States and joined the Union Army, changing his name along the way for some reason (a not-so-unusual occurrence among Civil War soldiers, I’ve discovered). He and Mariah had three children: Charles Sanford (1870 – 1871), Agnes (1872 – 1898), and Emma Alice LYTON.

When Emma was an infant, her mother married a German immigrant, John Christopher KLINDER. They had six more children: “Nancy” Florence (1876 – 1935), Laura Luella (1879 – 1962), Clara Amy (1881 – 1970), Ada (1884 – 1917), Samuel Ivory Lewis (1886 – 1970), and Susie KLINDER (1889 – 1977).

Around 1891, Emma married Albert Francis CHAPLIN (1868 – 1946), probably in Iowa. Together they had six children, nearly every child being born in a different community:

  • *John William “Bill” (1892 – 1970), Surprise, Butler Co., Nebraska
  • *Charles Cornelius (1893 – 1973), Percival, Fremont Co., Iowa
  • *Nellie Susan (1895 – 1969), McPaul, Fremont Co., Iowa
  • *Glen Albert (1898 – 1966), Vermillion, Clay Co., South Dakota
  • *Forrest L. “Frank” (1901 – 1977), Yankton, Yankton Co., South Dakota
  • *Velma Fern CHAPLIN (1903 – 1997), Yankton, Yankton Co., South Dakota

Additionally, the family were found in Lamar, Prowers Co., Colorado when the 1910 U.S. Federal Census was taken and enumerated in Jaqua Twp., Cheyenne Co., Kansas in 1920. It’s likely they were in Kansas so that Albert could care for his widowed mother and four older single brothers, all of whom died of strokes within the next decade. The family also lived for a time in Oklahoma, probably in Hydro, Caddo County, where Emma’s mother, step-father, and half-siblings had moved in 1886.

Emma and Albert’s youngest child, Velma, wrote “A History of the Chaplin Family,” and she recounts that the family made all their moves by covered wagon, even into the twentieth century. She wrote that these moves were great adventures for the children, but it must have been difficult for Emma to be raising a family and continuously following her husband back and forth across the Rockies and Great Plains. In 1930, with the children all grown, the couple was living in South Fruitland, Payette Co., Idaho, and five years later in the community of Payette, same county. By 1946, they had settled in the Yakima Valley of Washington State, and there Albert died in the City of Yakima. Emma moved to Portland, Multnomah Co., Oregan, probably to be near her daughter Nellie and son-in-law, George RICE. The above photographs were likely taken at her home at 6224 Southeast 111th Avenue in Portland. She passed away in that city nearly two years later on 22 Jul 1959 and was buried next to her husband at Terrace Heights Memorial Park, Yakima, Yakima Co., Washington.

From her birth to a Civil War veteran, to traveling the West by covered wagon, to the advent of the space age, her life spanned a time of great change in America.

Emma Alice (LYTON) CHAPLIN and Great-grandchildren

Source: Chaplin, Emma Alice Lyton with great-grandchildren. Photograph. C. late 1957 – early 1958. Original photograph in the possession of Alice Chaplin Midkiff. Vancouver, Washington. 2008.

This is one of only two photographs that I know about of Emma Alice (LYTON) CHAPLIN, my mother-in-law’s paternal grandmother. In this photograph, she is holding three of four great-grandchildren that were born to my mother-in-law and her two siblings in the spring of 1957. The three great-grandchildren are my husband, Norman Jon MIDIFF, and his twin girl cousins [names withheld for privacy] born to his maternal aunt and her husband. His maternal uncle and his wife also had a son born that same year, but they lived in California and were not able to attend this visit. At the same time, a four-generation photo was taken:

Source: Four-generations of the Lyton-Chaplin Family. Photograph. C. late 1957 – early 1958. Original photograph in the possession of Alice Chaplin Midkiff. Vancouver, Washington. 2008.

In the front row, left to right are my husband’s maternal grandfather, Forrest L. “Frank” CHAPLIN and his mother, Emma. I believe my husband, Norm, is sitting in his grandfather’s lap. In the back row are my mother-in-law and her sister.

Emma Alice LYTON was born 31 March 1874 in Thurmon, Fremont Co., Iowa to Mariah Emily (DAILEY) LYTON. Her father, Henry LYTON, had died the month previously. Henry was actually George TURK, born in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, who had come to the United States and joined the Union Army, changing his name along the way for some reason (a not-so-unusual occurrence among Civil War soldiers, I’ve discovered). He and Mariah had three children: Charles Sanford (1870 – 1871), Agnes (1872 – 1898), and Emma Alice LYTON.

When Emma was an infant, her mother married a German immigrant, John Christopher KLINDER. They had six more children: “Nancy” Florence (1876 – 1935), Laura Luella (1879 – 1962), Clara Amy (1881 – 1970), Ada (1884 – 1917), Samuel Ivory Lewis (1886 – 1970), and Susie KLINDER (1889 – 1977).

Around 1891, Emma married Albert Francis CHAPLIN (1868 – 1946), probably in Iowa. Together they had six children, nearly every child being born in a different community:

  • *John William “Bill” (1892 – 1970), Surprise, Butler Co., Nebraska
  • *Charles Cornelius (1893 – 1973), Percival, Fremont Co., Iowa
  • *Nellie Susan (1895 – 1969), McPaul, Fremont Co., Iowa
  • *Glen Albert (1898 – 1966), Vermillion, Clay Co., South Dakota
  • *Forrest L. “Frank” (1901 – 1977), Yankton, Yankton Co., South Dakota
  • *Velma Fern CHAPLIN (1903 – 1997), Yankton, Yankton Co., South Dakota

Additionally, the family were found in Lamar, Prowers Co., Colorado when the 1910 U.S. Federal Census was taken and enumerated in Jaqua Twp., Cheyenne Co., Kansas in 1920. It’s likely they were in Kansas so that Albert could care for his widowed mother and four older single brothers, all of whom died of strokes within the next decade. The family also lived for a time in Oklahoma, probably in Hydro, Caddo County, where Emma’s mother, step-father, and half-siblings had moved in 1886.

Emma and Albert’s youngest child, Velma, wrote “A History of the Chaplin Family,” and she recounts that the family made all their moves by covered wagon, even into the twentieth century. She wrote that these moves were great adventures for the children, but it must have been difficult for Emma to be raising a family and continuously following her husband back and forth across the Rockies and Great Plains. In 1930, with the children all grown, the couple was living in South Fruitland, Payette Co., Idaho, and five years later in the community of Payette, same county. By 1946, they had settled in the Yakima Valley of Washington State, and there Albert died in the City of Yakima. Emma moved to Portland, Multnomah Co., Oregan, probably to be near her daughter Nellie and son-in-law, George RICE. The above photographs were likely taken at her home at 6224 Southeast 111th Avenue in Portland. She passed away in that city nearly two years later on 22 Jul 1959 and was buried next to her husband at Terrace Heights Memorial Park, Yakima, Yakima Co., Washington.

From her birth to a Civil War veteran, to traveling the West by covered wagon, to the advent of the space age, her life spanned a time of great change in America.

Wordless Wednesday: Emma Alice (LYTON) CHAPLIN and great-grandchildren

Source: Chaplin, Emma Alice Lyton with great-grandchildren. Photograph. C. late 1957 – early 1958. Original photograph in the possession of Alice Chaplin Midkiff. Vancouver, Washington. 2008.

Wordless Wednesday: Emma Alice (LYTON) CHAPLIN and great-grandchildren

Source: Chaplin, Emma Alice Lyton with great-grandchildren. Photograph. C. late 1957 – early 1958. Original photograph in the possession of Alice Chaplin Midkiff. Vancouver, Washington. 2008.