A Civil War Soldier: Pvt. Benjamin Henry KIMBALL (1845 – 1924)

How Related: My 3rd-great-grandfather

Born: March 1845 in Michigan, probably in Pavilion Township, Kalamazoo County

Parents: William KIMBALL (c. 1806 – 1879) and Amanda WESTBROOK (1816 – c. 1882)

Siblings: Benjamin was sixth of eleven children and one of three brothers who served in the Union Army:

  • John E. (1835 – 1910)
  • William R. (1837 – 1924)
  • Fanny C. (c. 1838 – bef. 1853)
  • George Washington (1841 – 1918)
  • Mary Jane (c. 1844 – 1925)
  • David P. (c. 1848 – 1903)
  • Fanny Charlotte (b. c. 1853)
  • Ella A. (b. c. 1858)
  • Lydia P. (b. c. 1862)
  • Lucinda May (b. c. 1866)

Married: first, my ancestor, Lucy May DICKINSON (c. 1842 – 1873) on 5 September 1863 in Newaygo Co., Michigan. Second, Lydia L. (DAVID) DORWIN (1835 – 1906) on 3 July 1873 in Newaygo Co., Michigan

Children: With Lucy, Benjamin had four children: William Arthur (b. c. 1866), George Ezra (b. 1868), Leota Nellie (b. 1870), and my ancestor, Mary May KIMBALL (1873 – 1950). Benjamin did not have any known children with Lydia, but she had three children in their teens from her first husband at the time of her marriage to him, and he may have been responsible for their support until they married or became independent adults: Loarie (b. c. 1856; a daughter), Ernest W. (b. c. 1857), and Mary Jane DORWIN (b. 1859).

Source: Civil War Pension Index Card of Benjamin H. Kimball. National Archives and Records Administration. Civil War Pension Index: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934 [database on-line at http://www.ancestry.com]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2000. Original data: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. T288.

Source: Civil War Pension Index Card of Benjamin H. Kimball. Organization Index to Pension Files of Veterans Who Served Between 1861 and 1900. National Archives and Records Administration. Publication T289. Digital image purchased at Footnote [http://www.footnote.com/].

Enlisted: 29 March 1864 at Grand Rapids, Kent Co., Michigan in Co. D, 27th Michigan Infantry; private

Side served: Union

Mustered out: 26 July 1865 at Delaney House, Washington, D. C.

Biography or Information of Interest:

Henry and David Kimball and Orson David
By A.L. Spooner

In the spring of 1864, 3 young men from Fremont [Newaygo Co., Michigan] went to Grand Rapids [Kent Co., Michigan] to look for employment. They were Henry and David Kimball and Orson David. Not finding work, they decided to enlist in the army. In a few days they were sent to St. Johns [Clinton Co., Michigan] for training and then were assigned to Company D, 27th Regiment Michigan Volunteer Infantry.

The 27th Regiment took part in several of the hardest fought battles of the Civil War beginning with Vicksburg and ended with the capture of Petersburg, Virginia, April 3, 1865.

It has often been said that there were more casualties in the Civil War than the combined casualties of all the wars since. Some idea of the losses sustained by the 27th Regiment hen be gained from the following letter written by Orson David dated at Petersburg, Virgina, August 8, 1864 and addressed to: “Dear Brother and Sister,” which reads as follows:

“I received your letter this morning and was glad to hear from you. We had a big fight here on the 30th of last month (Battle of the Crater) but did not accomplish much. My company went into the charge with 34 men and when we came outt, we had 14 left. We lost a great many officers. The ground is black with knapsacks and guns. The talk now is that the whole regiment is coming to Michigan this fad because there are only 84 men in the regiment fit for duty out of 6 companies that came out with me. When our regiment started out last spring, there were 1,180 men and now we have got only 84. I have not got much to write this time, only if there were ever a fellow that wanted to see home and friends, it is myself.”

Source: David, Orson Otis. Photograph. C. 1864 or earlier. Original photograph in the possession of Archives of Michigan Digital Collection [http://haldigitalcollections.cdmhost.com/]. 2008.

Orson David never made it home. He was captured at the Battle of Weldon Railroad and confined to Andersonville Prison and later transferred to Wilmington Prison at Wilmington, North Carolina.

General Sherman reached Wilmington with its fort and prison in January, 1865. The records of the 27th Regiment show that Orson died March 3, 1865 and is buried in the National Cemetery at Wilmington.

After the war, Benjamin married my ancestor, Lucy May DICKINSON. She was the daughter and sister of Civil War soldiers Ezra, Philip Reuben and Wallace William DICKINSON. Together they had four children. At or shortly after the birth of their youngest child, Mary, Lucy died. Mary was raised by Lucy’s sister and brother-in-law, Mary (DICKINSON) and Philip WEAVER. Within four months, Benjamin married Lydia L. (DAVID) DORWIN, widow of Amos DORWIN, and mother of three teens. Lydia was the sister of Benjamin’s friend, Orson. Another David sibling, Able Artemus DAVID, married Benjamin’s sister, Mary Jane KIMBALL. It was only natural that with the Kimball and David families so entwined that Benjamin would marry Lydia, both needing each other for economic support and the raising of young children.

Benjamin was one of two great-grandfathers of my paternal grandfather, Robert Lewis ROBBINS, who had served during the Civil War and were alive during his childhood. Although my grandfather met one of these great-grandfathers (Charles H. ROBBINS) and even attended Grand Army of the Republic reunions with him, he never remembers meeting Benjamin.

Died: 28 January 1924 in Alba, Antrim Co., Michigan (see the story of how I found his death location after many years of searching, here)

Source: Tombstone of Benjamin H. and Lydia L. Kimbell, Plot M-02-02A-026-02-1, Maple Grove Cemetery, Fremont, Michigan. Photograph taken at the request of Miriam Robbins Midkiff by Find A Grave volunteer Jason Felton. Digital copy in the possession of Miriam Robbins Midkiff, Spokane, Washington. 2008.

Buried: Maple Grove Cemetery, Fremont, Dayton Twp., Newaygo Co., Michigan. Lydia shares his monumental tombstone, which is marked “KIMBELL.” Another alternate spelling is “Kimble.”

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A Civil War Soldier: Pvt. Benjamin Henry KIMBALL (1845 – 1924)

How Related: My 3rd-great-grandfather

Born: March 1845 in Michigan, probably in Pavilion Township, Kalamazoo County

Parents: William KIMBALL (c. 1806 – 1879) and Amanda WESTBROOK (1816 – c. 1882)

Siblings: Benjamin was sixth of eleven children and one of three brothers who served in the Union Army:

  • John E. (1835 – 1910)
  • William R. (1837 – 1924)
  • Fanny C. (c. 1838 – bef. 1853)
  • George Washington (1841 – 1918)
  • Mary Jane (c. 1844 – 1925)
  • David P. (c. 1848 – 1903)
  • Fanny Charlotte (b. c. 1853)
  • Ella A. (b. c. 1858)
  • Lydia P. (b. c. 1862)
  • Lucinda May (b. c. 1866)

Married: first, my ancestor, Lucy May DICKINSON (c. 1842 – 1873) on 5 September 1863 in Newaygo Co., Michigan. Second, Lydia L. (DAVID) DORWIN (1835 – 1906) on 3 July 1873 in Newaygo Co., Michigan

Children: With Lucy, Benjamin had four children: William Arthur (b. c. 1866), George Ezra (b. 1868), Leota Nellie (b. 1870), and my ancestor, Mary May KIMBALL (1873 – 1950). Benjamin did not have any known children with Lydia, but she had three children in their teens from her first husband at the time of her marriage to him, and he may have been responsible for their support until they married or became independent adults: Loarie (b. c. 1856; a daughter), Ernest W. (b. c. 1857), and Mary Jane DORWIN (b. 1859).

Source: Civil War Pension Index Card of Benjamin H. Kimball. National Archives and Records Administration. Civil War Pension Index: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934 [database on-line at http://www.ancestry.com]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2000. Original data: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. T288.

Source: Civil War Pension Index Card of Benjamin H. Kimball. Organization Index to Pension Files of Veterans Who Served Between 1861 and 1900. National Archives and Records Administration. Publication T289. Digital image purchased at Footnote [http://www.footnote.com/].

Enlisted: 29 March 1864 at Grand Rapids, Kent Co., Michigan in Co. D, 27th Michigan Infantry; private

Side served: Union

Mustered out: 26 July 1865 at Delaney House, Washington, D. C.

Biography or Information of Interest:

Henry and David Kimball and Orson David
By A.L. Spooner

In the spring of 1864, 3 young men from Fremont [Newaygo Co., Michigan] went to Grand Rapids [Kent Co., Michigan] to look for employment. They were Henry and David Kimball and Orson David. Not finding work, they decided to enlist in the army. In a few days they were sent to St. Johns [Clinton Co., Michigan] for training and then were assigned to Company D, 27th Regiment Michigan Volunteer Infantry.

The 27th Regiment took part in several of the hardest fought battles of the Civil War beginning with Vicksburg and ended with the capture of Petersburg, Virginia, April 3, 1865.

It has often been said that there were more casualties in the Civil War than the combined casualties of all the wars since. Some idea of the losses sustained by the 27th Regiment hen be gained from the following letter written by Orson David dated at Petersburg, Virgina, August 8, 1864 and addressed to: “Dear Brother and Sister,” which reads as follows:

“I received your letter this morning and was glad to hear from you. We had a big fight here on the 30th of last month (Battle of the Crater) but did not accomplish much. My company went into the charge with 34 men and when we came outt, we had 14 left. We lost a great many officers. The ground is black with knapsacks and guns. The talk now is that the whole regiment is coming to Michigan this fad because there are only 84 men in the regiment fit for duty out of 6 companies that came out with me. When our regiment started out last spring, there were 1,180 men and now we have got only 84. I have not got much to write this time, only if there were ever a fellow that wanted to see home and friends, it is myself.”

Source: David, Orson Otis. Photograph. C. 1864 or earlier. Original photograph in the possession of Archives of Michigan Digital Collection [http://haldigitalcollections.cdmhost.com/]. 2008.

Orson David never made it home. He was captured at the Battle of Weldon Railroad and confined to Andersonville Prison and later transferred to Wilmington Prison at Wilmington, North Carolina.

General Sherman reached Wilmington with its fort and prison in January, 1865. The records of the 27th Regiment show that Orson died March 3, 1865 and is buried in the National Cemetery at Wilmington.

After the war, Benjamin married my ancestor, Lucy May DICKINSON. She was the daughter and sister of Civil War soldiers Ezra, Philip Reuben and Wallace William DICKINSON. Together they had four children. At or shortly after the birth of their youngest child, Mary, Lucy died. Mary was raised by Lucy’s sister and brother-in-law, Mary (DICKINSON) and Philip WEAVER. Within four months, Benjamin married Lydia L. (DAVID) DORWIN, widow of Amos DORWIN, and mother of three teens. Lydia was the sister of Benjamin’s friend, Orson. Another David sibling, Able Artemus DAVID, married Benjamin’s sister, Mary Jane KIMBALL. It was only natural that with the Kimball and David families so entwined that Benjamin would marry Lydia, both needing each other for economic support and the raising of young children.

Benjamin was one of two great-grandfathers of my paternal grandfather, Robert Lewis ROBBINS, who had served during the Civil War and were alive during his childhood. Although my grandfather met one of these great-grandfathers (Charles H. ROBBINS) and even attended Grand Army of the Republic reunions with him, he never remembers meeting Benjamin.

Died: 28 January 1924 in Alba, Antrim Co., Michigan (see the story of how I found his death location after many years of searching, here)

Source: Tombstone of Benjamin H. and Lydia L. Kimbell, Plot M-02-02A-026-02-1, Maple Grove Cemetery, Fremont, Michigan. Photograph taken at the request of Miriam Robbins Midkiff by Find A Grave volunteer Jason Felton. Digital copy in the possession of Miriam Robbins Midkiff, Spokane, Washington. 2008.

Buried: Maple Grove Cemetery, Fremont, Dayton Twp., Newaygo Co., Michigan. Lydia shares his monumental tombstone, which is marked “KIMBELL.” Another alternate spelling is “Kimble.”

A Civil War Soldier: Pvt. William DICKINSON (1819 – 1901)

Source: Dickinson, William. Photograph. Date unknown. Digital image found at Newaygans in the Civil War [http://ncha.ncats.net/data/Civil_War_Veterans/]. Whereabouts of original photo unknown. 2008.

How Related: Brother of my 4th-great-grandfather, Ezra DICKINSON

Born: 29 November 1819 in Litchfield, Litchfield Co., Connecticut

Parents: Philip DICKINSON (1770 – 1859) and Phoebe HUTCHINSON (1773 – 1858)

Siblings: William was the youngest of 14 children!

  • Philip, Jr. (dates unknown)
  • Irena (1792 – 1841)
  • Eliza (1794 – 1830)
  • Nathaniel (b. 1796)
  • Delana W. (b. 1798)
  • Ezra (1800 – 1886)
  • Martha “Patty” (1802 – aft. 1892)
  • Laura (b. 1803)
  • Harriet Amanda (b. 1805)
  • Elisha (1808 – 1893)
  • Samuel (1811 – 1897)
  • Amelia (1814 – 1845)

Married: Caroline A. HART (c. 1819 – 1857) on 21 December 1844 in Cornwall, Litchfield Co., Connecticut. Also married Sarah A. BARNES (1836 – 1908) on 7 November 1857 in Johnston Twp., Trumbull Co., Ohio.

Children: Like many of the Dickinsons, William was prolific. He had 19 children between his two wives. With Caroline he had the following:

  • Walter (1844 – 1923) – also served in the same company and regiment as his father
  • Wallace (1847 – 1847)
  • Wallace (1848 – 1860)
  • Phoebe Hannah (1849 – 1929)
  • Mary Elizabeth (1850 – 1887)
  • Elias (c. 1852 – 1940)
  • Charles E. (1854 – 1924)

With Sarah, he had 12 children:

  • Willie (1858 – 1862)
  • Ida Mae (1859 – 1941)
  • Chester (1860 – 1876)
  • George Horatio (1863 – 1948)
  • Sherman (1865 – 1866)
  • Frank S. (1866 – 1947)
  • Gertrude (1869 – 1939)
  • Alice (1871 – 1942)
  • John Samuel (1873 – 1960)
  • William “Tige” (1875 – 1963)
  • Orla Belle (1877 – 1922)
  • Philip (1879 – 1955)

Source: Civil War Pension Index Card of William Dickinson. Organization Index to Pension Files of Veterans Who Served Between 1861 and 1900. National Archives and Records Administration. Publication T289. Digital image purchased at Footnote [http://www.footnote.com/].

Enlisted: 23 August 1861 in Co. K, 41st Ohio Infantry

Side Served: Union

History of Unit: 41st Ohio Infantry

Discharged: 24 July 1862 in Columbus, Franklin Co., Ohio

Biography or Information of Interest: For further information, see Newaygo in the Civil War by John A. Braden and my cousin Terry Wantz. Use the Find feature of your browser and look for Dickinson in the text.

Died: 12 November 1901 in Denver Twp., Newaygo Co., Michigan

Buried: 14 November 1901 in Bull Cemetery, Denver Twp., Newaygo Co., Michigan

A Civil War Soldier: Pvt. William DICKINSON (1819 – 1901)

Source: Dickinson, William. Photograph. Date unknown. Digital image found at Newaygans in the Civil War [http://ncha.ncats.net/data/Civil_War_Veterans/]. Whereabouts of original photo unknown. 2008.

How Related: Brother of my 4th-great-grandfather, Ezra DICKINSON

Born: 29 November 1819 in Litchfield, Litchfield Co., Connecticut

Parents: Philip DICKINSON (1770 – 1859) and Phoebe HUTCHINSON (1773 – 1858)

Siblings: William was the youngest of 14 children!

  • Philip, Jr. (dates unknown)
  • Irena (1792 – 1841)
  • Eliza (1794 – 1830)
  • Nathaniel (b. 1796)
  • Delana W. (b. 1798)
  • Ezra (1800 – 1886)
  • Martha “Patty” (1802 – aft. 1892)
  • Laura (b. 1803)
  • Harriet Amanda (b. 1805)
  • Elisha (1808 – 1893)
  • Samuel (1811 – 1897)
  • Amelia (1814 – 1845)

Married: Caroline A. HART (c. 1819 – 1857) on 21 December 1844 in Cornwall, Litchfield Co., Connecticut. Also married Sarah A. BARNES (1836 – 1908) on 7 November 1857 in Johnston Twp., Trumbull Co., Ohio.

Children: Like many of the Dickinsons, William was prolific. He had 19 children between his two wives. With Caroline he had the following:

  • Walter (1844 – 1923) – also served in the same company and regiment as his father
  • Wallace (1847 – 1847)
  • Wallace (1848 – 1860)
  • Phoebe Hannah (1849 – 1929)
  • Mary Elizabeth (1850 – 1887)
  • Elias (c. 1852 – 1940)
  • Charles E. (1854 – 1924)

With Sarah, he had 12 children:

  • Willie (1858 – 1862)
  • Ida Mae (1859 – 1941)
  • Chester (1860 – 1876)
  • George Horatio (1863 – 1948)
  • Sherman (1865 – 1866)
  • Frank S. (1866 – 1947)
  • Gertrude (1869 – 1939)
  • Alice (1871 – 1942)
  • John Samuel (1873 – 1960)
  • William “Tige” (1875 – 1963)
  • Orla Belle (1877 – 1922)
  • Philip (1879 – 1955)

Source: Civil War Pension Index Card of William Dickinson. Organization Index to Pension Files of Veterans Who Served Between 1861 and 1900. National Archives and Records Administration. Publication T289. Digital image purchased at Footnote [http://www.footnote.com/].

Enlisted: 23 August 1861 in Co. K, 41st Ohio Infantry

Side Served: Union

History of Unit: 41st Ohio Infantry

Discharged: 24 July 1862 in Columbus, Franklin Co., Ohio

Biography or Information of Interest: For further information, see Newaygo in the Civil War by John A. Braden and my cousin Terry Wantz. Use the Find feature of your browser and look for Dickinson in the text.

Died: 12 November 1901 in Denver Twp., Newaygo Co., Michigan

Buried: 14 November 1901 in Bull Cemetery, Denver Twp., Newaygo Co., Michigan

A Civil War Soldier: 1st Lt. Wallace William DICKINSON (c. 1831 – 1897)

Source: Dickinson, Wallace William. Photograph. C. 1863. Digital image found at Newaygans in the Civil War [http://ncha.ncats.net/data/Civil_War_Veterans/]. Whereabouts of original photo unknown. 2008.

How Related: Brother of my 3rd-great-grandmother, Lucy May DICKINSON

Born: c. 1831 in Johnston Twp., Trumbull Co., Ohio

Parents: Ezra DICKINSON (1800 – 1886) and Cynthia PHILLIPS (1802 – 1852)

Siblings: Wallace was one of 12 children:

  • Elizabeth (b. c. 1822)
  • John F. (b. c. 1825)
  • Philip Reuben (1827 – 1912)
  • son (b. c. 1828 – 1830)
  • son (c. 1833 – c. 1848)
  • Sherman S. (b. c. 1836)
  • Mary E. (1838 – 1924)
  • Harriet Anna (1840 – 1918)
  • Lucy May (c. 1842 – 1872) – my ancestor
  • Sarah Ann “Sally” (1846 – bef. 1900)
  • child (dates unknown)

Married: Elizabeth GARRISON (c. 1845 – 1940) on 8 January 1870 in Eastmanville, Ottawa Co., Michigan

Children: William (b. bef. 1897) and a daughter DICKINSON (d. bef. 1897)

Source: Sergeants of the 3rd Michigan Infantry. Photograph. C. 1861. Original photograph in the possession of Archives of Michigan Digital Collection [http://haldigitalcollections.cdmhost.com/]. 2008.
Sgt. Dickinson is believed to be the man squatting on the left.

Enlisted in: 13 May 1861 in Co. K, 3rd Michigan Infantry at Grand Rapids, Kent Co., Michigan; sergeant. Enlisted 25 July 1863 in Co. A, 10th Michigan Cavalry at Newaygo, Newaygo Co., Michigan; 2nd lieutenant. Enlisted 18 October 1863 in Co. A, 10th Michigan Cavalry at Newaygo, Newaygo Co., Michigan; 1st lieutenant.

Source: Officers of the 10th Michigan Cavalry. Photograph. C. 1863. Original photograph in the possession of Archives of Michigan Digital Collection [http://haldigitalcollections.cdmhost.com/]. 2008.
Lt. Dickinson is in the middle of the three men sitting on the ground.

Side Served: Union

History of Units: 3rd Michigan Infantry (here and here) and 10th Michigan Cavalry

Discharged: 24 January 1863 in Washington, D.C. due to disability; re-enlisted (see above)

Mustered Out: 11 November 1865 at Memphis, Tennessee

Biography or Information of Interest: (from his obituary) “Lt. Wallace W. Dickinson, a former resident of this county, and for 4 years county treasurer, died at his home in Grand Rapids on Thursday morning, June 10. Nearly the last request made by Mr. Dickinson was that his remains should be laid in the Newaygo Cemetery and the brethren of Newaygo Masonic Lodge of which he had long been a member should have charge of the services. When Mr. Dickinson was in Newaygo last fall attending the reunion, his friends felt that he had not long to stay and his old comrade, Lucius Gates, requested of Mrs. Dickinson to let him know of the death in order that the G.A.R. might attend his funeral in a body. Mr. Dickinson also requested that notice of his death be sent to John H. Simmons of this village who was county clerk at the time. Mr. Dickinson was county treasurer, a brother Mason and a life long friend Mr. Simmons, was notified of the requests and under his direction arrangements were made for the funeral and the family of the deceased are profoundly grateful to him and the citizens of Newaygo, the Masons and the G.A.R. for the tributes of respect and esteem paid his remains by his old friends, his brethren and comrades.

“Lt. Dickinson was born in Trumbull County, Ohio in 1831. A portion of his childhood days were spent in Indiana. He was educated in Hiram, Ohio and was a classmate of James A. Garfield. He came to this county in 1855 and settled near Croton. He was a pronounced anti-slavery man and at the first call to arms after the breaking out of the rebellion he enlisted in the Third Michigan Infantry, being, if we are correctly informed, the first man in the county to enter the service. After the expiration of his term of service he returned to Newaygo County and engaged actively in recruiting for the 10th Michigan Cavalry, being afterwards appointed to a Lieutenancy in the regiment. Judge Woodward, Lucius Gates and others who still reside here were members of this company. At the close of the war, he again returned to Newaygo and in 1868 was elected county treasurer which office he held for 4 years. At the expiration of his term of office, he engaged in lumbering and removed to Ludington to be nearer the scene of operations. After closing out his lumbering interests he removed to Grand Rapids which was his home until his death. About 1870 he was married to Miss Elizabeth Garrison of Eastmanville who survives him. Two children, a son and daughter came to them, the son is still living, the daughter having passed over a few years ago.

“For nearly 29 years, the writer enjoyed the friendship of Wallace W. Dickinson and his pure-hearted, unselfish and noble character impressed itself upon him at the beginning of that acquaintance. Guileless himself, he believed all men the same and on that account, he was sometimes imposed upon, but a man never lived that knew of a wrong thing intentionally done by him. Single-hearted and true to those he believed to be his friends, loyal to his country and his family, he leaves behind him that of which any man might be proud, the record of a pure and blameless life.”

For further information, see Newaygo in the Civil War by John A. Braden and my cousin Terry Wantz. Use the Find feature of your browser and look for Dickinson in the text. More on the Dickinson brothers can be found in the Portrait and Biographical Album of Newaygo Co., Michigan. Chicago, Illinois: Chapman Brothers, 1884.

Died: 10 June 1897 in Grand Rapids, Kent Co., Michigan

Buried: Newaygo Cemetery, Newaygo, Newaygo Co., Michigan

A Civil War Soldier: 1st Lt. Wallace William DICKINSON (c. 1831 – 1897)

Source: Dickinson, Wallace William. Photograph. C. 1863. Digital image found at Newaygans in the Civil War [http://ncha.ncats.net/data/Civil_War_Veterans/]. Whereabouts of original photo unknown. 2008.

How Related: Brother of my 3rd-great-grandmother, Lucy May DICKINSON

Born: c. 1831 in Johnston Twp., Trumbull Co., Ohio

Parents: Ezra DICKINSON (1800 – 1886) and Cynthia PHILLIPS (1802 – 1852)

Siblings: Wallace was one of 12 children:

  • Elizabeth (b. c. 1822)
  • John F. (b. c. 1825)
  • Philip Reuben (1827 – 1912)
  • son (b. c. 1828 – 1830)
  • son (c. 1833 – c. 1848)
  • Sherman S. (b. c. 1836)
  • Mary E. (1838 – 1924)
  • Harriet Anna (1840 – 1918)
  • Lucy May (c. 1842 – 1872) – my ancestor
  • Sarah Ann “Sally” (1846 – bef. 1900)
  • child (dates unknown)

Married: Elizabeth GARRISON (c. 1845 – 1940) on 8 January 1870 in Eastmanville, Ottawa Co., Michigan

Children: William (b. bef. 1897) and a daughter DICKINSON (d. bef. 1897)

Source: Sergeants of the 3rd Michigan Infantry. Photograph. C. 1861. Original photograph in the possession of Archives of Michigan Digital Collection [http://haldigitalcollections.cdmhost.com/]. 2008.
Sgt. Dickinson is believed to be the man squatting on the left.

Enlisted in: 13 May 1861 in Co. K, 3rd Michigan Infantry at Grand Rapids, Kent Co., Michigan; sergeant. Enlisted 25 July 1863 in Co. A, 10th Michigan Cavalry at Newaygo, Newaygo Co., Michigan; 2nd lieutenant. Enlisted 18 October 1863 in Co. A, 10th Michigan Cavalry at Newaygo, Newaygo Co., Michigan; 1st lieutenant.

Source: Officers of the 10th Michigan Cavalry. Photograph. C. 1863. Original photograph in the possession of Archives of Michigan Digital Collection [http://haldigitalcollections.cdmhost.com/]. 2008.
Lt. Dickinson is in the middle of the three men sitting on the ground.

Side Served: Union

History of Units: 3rd Michigan Infantry (here and here) and 10th Michigan Cavalry

Discharged: 24 January 1863 in Washington, D.C. due to disability; re-enlisted (see above)

Mustered Out: 11 November 1865 at Memphis, Tennessee

Biography or Information of Interest: (from his obituary) “Lt. Wallace W. Dickinson, a former resident of this county, and for 4 years county treasurer, died at his home in Grand Rapids on Thursday morning, June 10. Nearly the last request made by Mr. Dickinson was that his remains should be laid in the Newaygo Cemetery and the brethren of Newaygo Masonic Lodge of which he had long been a member should have charge of the services. When Mr. Dickinson was in Newaygo last fall attending the reunion, his friends felt that he had not long to stay and his old comrade, Lucius Gates, requested of Mrs. Dickinson to let him know of the death in order that the G.A.R. might attend his funeral in a body. Mr. Dickinson also requested that notice of his death be sent to John H. Simmons of this village who was county clerk at the time. Mr. Dickinson was county treasurer, a brother Mason and a life long friend Mr. Simmons, was notified of the requests and under his direction arrangements were made for the funeral and the family of the deceased are profoundly grateful to him and the citizens of Newaygo, the Masons and the G.A.R. for the tributes of respect and esteem paid his remains by his old friends, his brethren and comrades.

“Lt. Dickinson was born in Trumbull County, Ohio in 1831. A portion of his childhood days were spent in Indiana. He was educated in Hiram, Ohio and was a classmate of James A. Garfield. He came to this county in 1855 and settled near Croton. He was a pronounced anti-slavery man and at the first call to arms after the breaking out of the rebellion he enlisted in the Third Michigan Infantry, being, if we are correctly informed, the first man in the county to enter the service. After the expiration of his term of service he returned to Newaygo County and engaged actively in recruiting for the 10th Michigan Cavalry, being afterwards appointed to a Lieutenancy in the regiment. Judge Woodward, Lucius Gates and others who still reside here were members of this company. At the close of the war, he again returned to Newaygo and in 1868 was elected county treasurer which office he held for 4 years. At the expiration of his term of office, he engaged in lumbering and removed to Ludington to be nearer the scene of operations. After closing out his lumbering interests he removed to Grand Rapids which was his home until his death. About 1870 he was married to Miss Elizabeth Garrison of Eastmanville who survives him. Two children, a son and daughter came to them, the son is still living, the daughter having passed over a few years ago.

“For nearly 29 years, the writer enjoyed the friendship of Wallace W. Dickinson and his pure-hearted, unselfish and noble character impressed itself upon him at the beginning of that acquaintance. Guileless himself, he believed all men the same and on that account, he was sometimes imposed upon, but a man never lived that knew of a wrong thing intentionally done by him. Single-hearted and true to those he believed to be his friends, loyal to his country and his family, he leaves behind him that of which any man might be proud, the record of a pure and blameless life.”

For further information, see Newaygo in the Civil War by John A. Braden and my cousin Terry Wantz. Use the Find feature of your browser and look for Dickinson in the text. More on the Dickinson brothers can be found in the Portrait and Biographical Album of Newaygo Co., Michigan. Chicago, Illinois: Chapman Brothers, 1884.

Died: 10 June 1897 in Grand Rapids, Kent Co., Michigan

Buried: Newaygo Cemetery, Newaygo, Newaygo Co., Michigan

A Civil War Soldier: Sgt. Philip Reuben DICKINSON (1827 – 1912)

Source: Dickinson, Philip Reuben. Photograph. Early twentieth century. Digital image found at Newaygans in the Civil War [http://ncha.ncats.net/data/Civil_War_Veterans/]. Whereabouts of original photo unknown. 2008.

How Related: Brother of my 3rd-great-grandmother, Lucy May DICKINSON

Born: 25 December 1827 in Johnston Twp., Trumbull Co., Ohio

Parents: Ezra DICKINSON (1800 – 1886) and Cynthia PHILLIPS (1802 – 1852)

Siblings: Philip had 11 siblings!

  • Elizabeth (b. c. 1822)
  • John F. (b. c. 1825)
  • brother (b. c. 1828 – 1830)
  • Wallace William (c. 1831 – 1897)
  • brother (c. 1833 – c. 1848)
  • Sherman S. (b. c. 1836)
  • Mary E. (1838 – 1924)
  • Harriet Anna (1840 – 1918)
  • Lucy May (c. 1842 – 1872) – my ancestor
  • Sarah Ann “Sally” (1846 – bef. 1900)
  • sibling (dates unknown)

Married: Sophronia TIBBETS (1834 – 1912) on 27 July 1856 in Fremont Center (now Fremont), Denver Twp., Newaygo Co., Michigan

Children: Harriet Alice (1857 – 1934), Ada May (1859 – 1881), Arsa Ezra (1862 – 1862), Cynthia (b. c. 1863), Mary (b. c. 1866), Willard Walter (b. 1868), Philip Grant (b. 1872), and Clara Bell DICKINSON (b. 1879). Two more unknown.

Source: Civil War Pension Index Card of Philip R. Dickinson. Organization Index to Pension Files of Veterans Who Served Between 1861 and 1900. National Archives and Records Administration. Publication T289. Digital image purchased at Footnote [http://www.footnote.com/].

Enlisted: as a Corporal on 13 July 1863 at Fremont, Newaygo Co., Michigan. Enlisted in Company A, 10th Michigan Cavalry on 2 September 1863. Promoted to Full Sergeant.

Side Served: Union

History of Unit: 10th Michigan Cavalry

Discharged: 20 Nov 1865 at Detroit, Wayne Co., Michigan

Biography or Information of Interest: For further information, see Newaygo in the Civil War by John A. Braden and my cousin Terry Wantz. Use the Find feature of your browser and look for Dickinson in the text.

More on the Dickinson brothers can be found in the Portrait and Biographical Album of Newaygo Co., Michigan. Chicago, Illinois: Chapman Brothers, 1884.

Died: 5 October 1912, Croton Twp., Newaygo Co., Michigan

Buried: 8 October 1912, Oak Grove Cemetery, Croton Twp., Newaygo Co., Michigan