Happy Bastille Day!

Photobucket
Image courtesy of 3D Flags

Happy Bastille Day to any of my readers that also have French ancestry! My husband and I don’t have a lot of French in us, but I did some looking through my family tree database and came up with the following:

One of my husband’s maternal 2nd-great-grandfathers was François Joseph MARTIN (c. 1828 – 1897), born in Strasbourg, Alsace, France, son of François MARTIN and Anna Eve ROUECHE. He emigrated to America before 1848, marrying Rachel HUBBY, of Scots and English ancestry, that year in Illinois. This line is probably the most recent and heaviest French line of all our children’s ancestors.

In another maternal line, my husband has DeVERRE ancestry that came out of Louisiana into Kentucky by the early 1800s. It’s probable that this is another French line.

A 9th-great-grandfather on my father’s side was Jacques CAUDEBEC who, according to family history, was born c. 1666 in Caudebec, Normandy, France. The village was likely Caudebec-en-Caux. Jacques emigrated to New York City, where he married a Dutch woman, Margaretta PROVOOST. If my family history is correct, both died at advanced ages in what is now Orange County, New York.

On my mother’s side, one of her lines that came out of the Province of Friesland, the Netherlands, was the RENEMA family. It is very likely that this surname is a French derivative (it literally means “of René”–not a Dutch name!) and may be a reference to a French Huguenot (Protestant) patriarch who may have left France for religiously tolerant Holland after the Edict of Fontainebleau.

None of these lines produce much more than a drop in the bucket of our children’s combined ancestry, which is mainly German, English, Dutch and Frisian, Norwegian and Scots. However, it is interesting to review, and perhaps someday I will do some active research on these families.

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Happy Bastille Day!

Photobucket
Image courtesy of 3D Flags

Happy Bastille Day to any of my readers that also have French ancestry! My husband and I don’t have a lot of French in us, but I did some looking through my family tree database and came up with the following:

One of my husband’s maternal 2nd-great-grandfathers was François Joseph MARTIN (c. 1828 – 1897), born in Strasbourg, Alsace, France, son of François MARTIN and Anna Eve ROUECHE. He emigrated to America before 1848, marrying Rachel HUBBY, of Scots and English ancestry, that year in Illinois. This line is probably the most recent and heaviest French line of all our children’s ancestors.

In another maternal line, my husband has DeVERRE ancestry that came out of Louisiana into Kentucky by the early 1800s. It’s probable that this is another French line.

A 9th-great-grandfather on my father’s side was Jacques CAUDEBEC who, according to family history, was born c. 1666 in Caudebec, Normandy, France. The village was likely Caudebec-en-Caux. Jacques emigrated to New York City, where he married a Dutch woman, Margaretta PROVOOST. If my family history is correct, both died at advanced ages in what is now Orange County, New York.

On my mother’s side, one of her lines that came out of the Province of Friesland, the Netherlands, was the RENEMA family. It is very likely that this surname is a French derivative (it literally means “of René”–not a Dutch name!) and may be a reference to a French Huguenot (Protestant) patriarch who may have left France for religiously tolerant Holland after the Edict of Fontainebleau.

None of these lines produce much more than a drop in the bucket of our children’s combined ancestry, which is mainly German, English, Dutch and Frisian, Norwegian and Scots. However, it is interesting to review, and perhaps someday I will do some active research on these families.

A Relaxing Day

Today I had a rare treat: nine hours of being home alone; no teens, no hubby, no cares, no interruptions (even the cat knew better than to bother me!). The kids were gone all day to Silverwood with their church youth group, so after my husband left for work in the early afternoon, I enjoyed the peace and quiet.

I polished up my syllabus on Message Boards that I’ll be presenting on August 18th for our EWGS members’ computer class. And I’ve been having an incredibly fun time delving into the lives of the neighbors of my great-grandfather, William Bryan ROBBINS, as part of the series of posts I’m blogging on his military service in North Russia at the end of World War One. In a letter from home, his mother mentions a number of relatives, friends, and neighbors, and putting this “mini-community” into context with my ancestors’ lives has been enriching. I hope that I have enough time to post the next two blogs in that series before we leave on vacation this coming weekend (sheesh! all the work that goes into “getting away” creates a need for a vacation from the vacation, if you follow me!).

One of the things I “stumbled upon” while doing some more research on World War I, was this astonishing website of color World War I photos…did you know any existed? Well, neither did I! It is a true documentary of the grim results of war; shelled buildings, hospital wards, refugees. I must have spent over an hour visiting this site, by turns fascinated by how color creates a starker reality than black-and-white does and mourning the evident loss of life and destruction of the great architecture of France (medieval cathedrals have always captivated me).

Oh, and by the way, I was encouraged by the Footnote team to create a Story Page about Bryan in North Russia, especially considering their recent release of the Historical Files of the American Expeditionary Forces. Labeled “A Polar Bear in North Russia,” my Story Page is a copy of the series found here on my blog. What are Story Pages? They can be anything you want them to be: a blog, a research log, an online scrapbook, a way to share information with family and friends. And you don’t need to purchase a subscription at Footnote to start one; just sign up for a free membership. Think you might like to have full access to this website? Check out your local Family History Center to see if they have a Footnote subscription yet (if not, check back again – soon all FHCs will have access). This is a terrific way to discover for yourself all the fascinating features of Footnote; I’ll bet after playing around on this site you won’t be able to resist signing up for their affordable subscription!

Darn! It’s time to turn off the computer and go pick up the kids!

A Relaxing Day

Today I had a rare treat: nine hours of being home alone; no teens, no hubby, no cares, no interruptions (even the cat knew better than to bother me!). The kids were gone all day to Silverwood with their church youth group, so after my husband left for work in the early afternoon, I enjoyed the peace and quiet.

I polished up my syllabus on Message Boards that I’ll be presenting on August 18th for our EWGS members’ computer class. And I’ve been having an incredibly fun time delving into the lives of the neighbors of my great-grandfather, William Bryan ROBBINS, as part of the series of posts I’m blogging on his military service in North Russia at the end of World War One. In a letter from home, his mother mentions a number of relatives, friends, and neighbors, and putting this “mini-community” into context with my ancestors’ lives has been enriching. I hope that I have enough time to post the next two blogs in that series before we leave on vacation this coming weekend (sheesh! all the work that goes into “getting away” creates a need for a vacation from the vacation, if you follow me!).

One of the things I “stumbled upon” while doing some more research on World War I, was this astonishing website of color World War I photos…did you know any existed? Well, neither did I! It is a true documentary of the grim results of war; shelled buildings, hospital wards, refugees. I must have spent over an hour visiting this site, by turns fascinated by how color creates a starker reality than black-and-white does and mourning the evident loss of life and destruction of the great architecture of France (medieval cathedrals have always captivated me).

Oh, and by the way, I was encouraged by the Footnote team to create a Story Page about Bryan in North Russia, especially considering their recent release of the Historical Files of the American Expeditionary Forces. Labeled “A Polar Bear in North Russia,” my Story Page is a copy of the series found here on my blog. What are Story Pages? They can be anything you want them to be: a blog, a research log, an online scrapbook, a way to share information with family and friends. And you don’t need to purchase a subscription at Footnote to start one; just sign up for a free membership. Think you might like to have full access to this website? Check out your local Family History Center to see if they have a Footnote subscription yet (if not, check back again – soon all FHCs will have access). This is a terrific way to discover for yourself all the fascinating features of Footnote; I’ll bet after playing around on this site you won’t be able to resist signing up for their affordable subscription!

Darn! It’s time to turn off the computer and go pick up the kids!

GeneaSofts Website Launched

Jean-Ives Baxter, creator of the French GeneaSofts website, sent me the following announcement:

The English version of GeneaSofts is launched!

I first created the French version of the GeneaSofts website in September 2005 and it immediately became very popular.

About GeneaSofts
GeneaSofts is the only one website on the net that gives daily news on genealogy softwares, web-based user interfaces and other genealogy tech news!

I have developed my own tools and alerts to trace all software releases and new softwares, from the unknown to the best seller.

An update of the site has been done — for the last four months — to let you see how interesting, useful and efficient GeneaSofts is.

About me
Genealogist and software developer.

Regular author for La Revue Française de Généalogie, the #1 genealogy magazine in France.

Web developer and in charge of the Anglo-Saxon partnerships for GeneaNet, free collaborative database since 1996.

About GeneaNet
Features :

  • Upload GEDCOM files
  • Dynamic online family trees
  • Web user interface
  • Search tools
  • “Cross-Database Search” : automatically compares your file against the complete database
  • Upload pictures and records, and link them to any individual of your online family tree, etc.

(GeneaNet was Google-translated and I correct it as fast as I can 😉

Hope that you will enjoy GeneaSofts!

Best regards,

Jean-Yves BAXTER

3 rue de la fontaine
26100 ROMANS SUR ISERE
FRANCE

GeneaSofts
GeneaSofts (French)
GeneaNet
GeneaWiki
La Revue Française de Généalogie

GeneaSofts Website Launched

Jean-Ives Baxter, creator of the French GeneaSofts website, sent me the following announcement:

The English version of GeneaSofts is launched!

I first created the French version of the GeneaSofts website in September 2005 and it immediately became very popular.

About GeneaSofts
GeneaSofts is the only one website on the net that gives daily news on genealogy softwares, web-based user interfaces and other genealogy tech news!

I have developed my own tools and alerts to trace all software releases and new softwares, from the unknown to the best seller.

An update of the site has been done — for the last four months — to let you see how interesting, useful and efficient GeneaSofts is.

About me
Genealogist and software developer.

Regular author for La Revue Française de Généalogie, the #1 genealogy magazine in France.

Web developer and in charge of the Anglo-Saxon partnerships for GeneaNet, free collaborative database since 1996.

About GeneaNet
Features :

  • Upload GEDCOM files
  • Dynamic online family trees
  • Web user interface
  • Search tools
  • “Cross-Database Search” : automatically compares your file against the complete database
  • Upload pictures and records, and link them to any individual of your online family tree, etc.

(GeneaNet was Google-translated and I correct it as fast as I can 😉

Hope that you will enjoy GeneaSofts!

Best regards,

Jean-Yves BAXTER

3 rue de la fontaine
26100 ROMANS SUR ISERE
FRANCE

GeneaSofts
GeneaSofts (French)
GeneaNet
GeneaWiki
La Revue Française de Généalogie