Ann (WILSON) WESTABY (1822 – 1902)

Source: Westaby, Ann Wilson. Photograph. Date unknown (c. 1870s – 1880s?). Original photograph believed to be in the possession of David Eden, Bushnell, Illinois. 2008.

Ann WILSON was my husband’s 3rd-great-grandmother, and of all our English ancestors, one of the most recent immigrant ones. She was born 22 October 1822 (her family Bible says October 21st), probably in Holton Le More, Lincolnshire, England, the seventh of ten or eleven children born to William WILSON and his wife Maria [–?–]. Ann married George Rice WESTABY of Barrow-Upon-Humber, Glanford Brigg, Lincolnshire 12 April 1850 in Glanford Brigg. I’ve blogged before about how Ann, George, George’s brother Charles, a number of WILSONs and some possible relatives, the MILLTHORPEs, arrived in New York City on 22 May 1822 on the Western World. The WESTABYs made their way to Jo Daviess Co., Illinois, where they lived in the Apple River and Woodbine communities.

Ann and George had seven children: Stephen, Thomas William, Wilson, Mary Maria, George Rice (my husband’s ancestor, who always went by his middle name), a child who apparently died young, and James. Only four–Stephen, Tom, Wilson, and Rice–survived childhood. However, they raised Ann’s grandnephew, Thomas WILSON, born 28 August 1864, whom Ann brought with her to Illinois after a visit to relatives in England sometime before 1878. Thomas’ grandfather is not named in The History of Jo Daviess County, Illinois (published 1878 by H.F. Kett & Co., Chicago); he would have had to have been one of Ann’s brothers who survived childhood: Thomas, William, or Robert–although, I suppose it’s always likely that Ann’s grandnephew was the grandson of one of Ann’s sisters, perhaps unmarried: Mary, Sarah, Elizabeth, or Maria (who may have been a niece, not a sister of Ann).

I have another digital copy of a photograph of Ann, taken during her elder years. Not a particularly attractive woman to begin with, this photo shows she suffered from female baldness, whether from genetics or ill health:

Source: Westaby, Ann Wilson. Photograph. Date unknown (c. 1890s – 1902?). Original photograph believed to be in the possession of David Eden, Bushnell, Illinois. 2008.

What Ann did leave behind to her son Stephen when she passed away on 10 March 1902 was her family Bible. Recently, a descendant of hers contacted me after seeing family tree information online, which I had posted. He generously scanned the Bible and sent the scans to me on discs. This was a treasure, because it confirmed and/or corrected written family records that had been handed down without citation through the generations to my husband’s maternal grandmother. In addition, it provided a residence for Ann’s parents (Holton Le More) which we did not have previously.

Source: Westaby, Ann Wilson, Family Bible Records, 1802 – 1878. The New Testament of Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. New York: American Bible Society, unknown date. Privately held by David Eden, Bushnell, Illinois. 2008.

Source: Tombstone of Ann (Wilson) Westaby. Thompson Cemetery, Jo Daviess Co., Illinois. Digital photograph taken by Find A Grave photo volunteer Bonnie Sellig. Digital copy in the possession of Miriam Robbins Midkiff, Spokane, Washington. 2001.

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Ann (WILSON) WESTABY (1822 – 1902)

Source: Westaby, Ann Wilson. Photograph. Date unknown (c. 1870s – 1880s?). Original photograph believed to be in the possession of David Eden, Bushnell, Illinois. 2008.

Ann WILSON was my husband’s 3rd-great-grandmother, and of all our English ancestors, one of the most recent immigrant ones. She was born 22 October 1822 (her family Bible says October 21st), probably in Holton Le More, Lincolnshire, England, the seventh of ten or eleven children born to William WILSON and his wife Maria [–?–]. Ann married George Rice WESTABY of Barrow-Upon-Humber, Glanford Brigg, Lincolnshire 12 April 1850 in Glanford Brigg. I’ve blogged before about how Ann, George, George’s brother Charles, a number of WILSONs and some possible relatives, the MILLTHORPEs, arrived in New York City on 22 May 1822 on the Western World. The WESTABYs made their way to Jo Daviess Co., Illinois, where they lived in the Apple River and Woodbine communities.

Ann and George had seven children: Stephen, Thomas William, Wilson, Mary Maria, George Rice (my husband’s ancestor, who always went by his middle name), a child who apparently died young, and James. Only four–Stephen, Tom, Wilson, and Rice–survived childhood. However, they raised Ann’s grandnephew, Thomas WILSON, born 28 August 1864, whom Ann brought with her to Illinois after a visit to relatives in England sometime before 1878. Thomas’ grandfather is not named in The History of Jo Daviess County, Illinois (published 1878 by H.F. Kett & Co., Chicago); he would have had to have been one of Ann’s brothers who survived childhood: Thomas, William, or Robert–although, I suppose it’s always likely that Ann’s grandnephew was the grandson of one of Ann’s sisters, perhaps unmarried: Mary, Sarah, Elizabeth, or Maria (who may have been a niece, not a sister of Ann).

I have another digital copy of a photograph of Ann, taken during her elder years. Not a particularly attractive woman to begin with, this photo shows she suffered from female baldness, whether from genetics or ill health:

Source: Westaby, Ann Wilson. Photograph. Date unknown (c. 1890s – 1902?). Original photograph believed to be in the possession of David Eden, Bushnell, Illinois. 2008.

What Ann did leave behind to her son Stephen when she passed away on 10 March 1902 was her family Bible. Recently, a descendant of hers contacted me after seeing family tree information online, which I had posted. He generously scanned the Bible and sent the scans to me on discs. This was a treasure, because it confirmed and/or corrected written family records that had been handed down without citation through the generations to my husband’s maternal grandmother. In addition, it provided a residence for Ann’s parents (Holton Le More) which we did not have previously.

Source: Westaby, Ann Wilson, Family Bible Records, 1802 – 1878. The New Testament of Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. New York: American Bible Society, unknown date. Privately held by David Eden, Bushnell, Illinois. 2008.

Source: Tombstone of Ann (Wilson) Westaby. Thompson Cemetery, Jo Daviess Co., Illinois. Digital photograph taken by Find A Grave photo volunteer Bonnie Sellig. Digital copy in the possession of Miriam Robbins Midkiff, Spokane, Washington. 2001.

A Civil War Soldier: Pvt. Joseph Hardin HAINLINE (1837 – 1882)

How Related: Brother of my husband’s 2nd-great-grandmother, Susan W. HAINLINE

Born: 2 February 1837, Sciota Twp., McDonough Co., Illinois

Parents: John W. HAINLINE (1796 – 1861) and Mary DeVERRE (1803 – 1871)

Siblings: Joseph was one of 11 children and one of three sons to serve in the Union Army:

  • David Trimble (1827 – 1865)
  • Susan W. (1828 – 1914) – my husband’s ancestor
  • Mary DeVerre (1829 – 1892)
  • Henry C. (1831 – 1862)
  • Thomas Smith (1833 – 1895)
  • John H. (1834 – 1840)
  • Nancy Ellen (1839 – 1880)
  • Baxter Richard (1841 – 1922)
  • Sarah (1845 – 1908)
  • John William (1846 – 1917)

Married: Virginia Ann GRIFFITH (1843 – 1941) on 26 November 1862 in McDonough Co., Illinois

Children: David Trimble (1869 – 1942); James Ira (1871 – 1945); Nancy Olive (1873 – 1956); and Madison Herbert HAINLINE (1876 – 1935)

Source: Civil War Pension Index Card of Joseph H. Hainline. Organization Index to Pension Files of Veterans Who Served Between 1861 and 1900. National Archives and Records Administration. Publication T289. Digital image purchased at Footnote [http://www.footnote.com/].

Enlisted: 14 August 1862; private. Enlisted 10 September 1862 in Co. I, 124th Illinois Infantry.

Side served: Union

History of Unit: 124th Illinois Infantry

Mustered out: 15 August 1865 at Camp Douglas, Chicago, Cooke Co., Illinois

Biography or Information of Interest: Again, I don’t have a lot of detailed information on the Hainline brothers. I know they descended from Palatine immigrants with the surname HENLEIN who arrived in Virginia in the mid-1700s. The fact that Joseph lived less than 17 years after the war ended tells me that he may have died of war-related injury or illness.

Died: 12 January 1882 in Sciota Twp., McDonough Co., Illinois

Source: Headstone of Joseph Hardin Hainline, Spring Creek Cemetery, Emmet Twp., McDonough Co., Illinois. Original photograph in the possession of Carol Dowell, McDonough Co., Illinois. 2002.

Buried: Spring Creek Cemetery, Emmet Twp., McDonough Co., Illinois

A Civil War Soldier: Pvt. Joseph Hardin HAINLINE (1837 – 1882)

How Related: Brother of my husband’s 2nd-great-grandmother, Susan W. HAINLINE

Born: 2 February 1837, Sciota Twp., McDonough Co., Illinois

Parents: John W. HAINLINE (1796 – 1861) and Mary DeVERRE (1803 – 1871)

Siblings: Joseph was one of 11 children and one of three sons to serve in the Union Army:

  • David Trimble (1827 – 1865)
  • Susan W. (1828 – 1914) – my husband’s ancestor
  • Mary DeVerre (1829 – 1892)
  • Henry C. (1831 – 1862)
  • Thomas Smith (1833 – 1895)
  • John H. (1834 – 1840)
  • Nancy Ellen (1839 – 1880)
  • Baxter Richard (1841 – 1922)
  • Sarah (1845 – 1908)
  • John William (1846 – 1917)

Married: Virginia Ann GRIFFITH (1843 – 1941) on 26 November 1862 in McDonough Co., Illinois

Children: David Trimble (1869 – 1942); James Ira (1871 – 1945); Nancy Olive (1873 – 1956); and Madison Herbert HAINLINE (1876 – 1935)

Source: Civil War Pension Index Card of Joseph H. Hainline. Organization Index to Pension Files of Veterans Who Served Between 1861 and 1900. National Archives and Records Administration. Publication T289. Digital image purchased at Footnote [http://www.footnote.com/].

Enlisted: 14 August 1862; private. Enlisted 10 September 1862 in Co. I, 124th Illinois Infantry.

Side served: Union

History of Unit: 124th Illinois Infantry

Mustered out: 15 August 1865 at Camp Douglas, Chicago, Cooke Co., Illinois

Biography or Information of Interest: Again, I don’t have a lot of detailed information on the Hainline brothers. I know they descended from Palatine immigrants with the surname HENLEIN who arrived in Virginia in the mid-1700s. The fact that Joseph lived less than 17 years after the war ended tells me that he may have died of war-related injury or illness.

Died: 12 January 1882 in Sciota Twp., McDonough Co., Illinois

Source: Headstone of Joseph Hardin Hainline, Spring Creek Cemetery, Emmet Twp., McDonough Co., Illinois. Original photograph in the possession of Carol Dowell, McDonough Co., Illinois. 2002.

Buried: Spring Creek Cemetery, Emmet Twp., McDonough Co., Illinois

A Civil War Soldier: Pvt. David Trimble HAINLINE (1827 – 1865)

How Related: Brother of my husband’s 2nd-great-grandmother, Susan W. HAINLINE

Born: 7 June 1827, Montgomery Co., Kentucky

Parents: John W. HAINLINE (1796 – 1861) and Mary DeVERRE (1803 – 1871)

Siblings: David was one of 11 children and one of three sons to serve in the Union Army:

  • Susan W. (1828 – 1914) – my husband’s ancestor
  • Mary DeVerre (1829 – 1892)
  • Henry C. (1831 – 1862)
  • Thomas Smith (1833 – 1895)
  • John H. (1834 – 1840)
  • Joseph Hardin (1837 – 1882)
  • Nancy Ellen (1839 – 1880)
  • Baxter Richard (1841 – 1922)
  • Sarah (1845 – 1908)
  • John William (1846 – 1917)

Married: Elizabeth Ann SHRYACK (b. c. 1826) on 16 December 1852 in McDonough Co., Illinois

Children: Frances A. (1854 – 1933) , John W. (1855 – 1923) and daughter HAINLINE (d. 1858)

Source: Civil War Pension Index Card of David T. Hainline. Organization Index to Pension Files of Veterans Who Served Between 1861 and 1900. National Archives and Records Administration. Publication T289. Digital image purchased at Footnote [http://www.footnote.com/].

Enlisted: 22 August 1862; private. Enlisted 27 September 1862 in Co. I, 124th Illinois Infantry

Side served: Union

History of Unit: 124th Illinois Infantry

Discharged: 15 February 1863 for disability

Biography or Information of Interest: David is a bit of a mystery. While he died just after the war, it is not clear from what little information I can find if he died from a war-related injury or illness, although I suspect that is the case. Since I currently don’t have access to his pension records (for his wife and orphans), I don’t have the necessary details.

Died: 29 July 1865, McDonough Co., Illinois

Buried: Spring Creek Cemetery, Emmet Twp., McDonough Co., Illinois

A Civil War Soldier: Pvt. David Trimble HAINLINE (1827 – 1865)

How Related: Brother of my husband’s 2nd-great-grandmother, Susan W. HAINLINE

Born: 7 June 1827, Montgomery Co., Kentucky

Parents: John W. HAINLINE (1796 – 1861) and Mary DeVERRE (1803 – 1871)

Siblings: David was one of 11 children and one of three sons to serve in the Union Army:

  • Susan W. (1828 – 1914) – my husband’s ancestor
  • Mary DeVerre (1829 – 1892)
  • Henry C. (1831 – 1862)
  • Thomas Smith (1833 – 1895)
  • John H. (1834 – 1840)
  • Joseph Hardin (1837 – 1882)
  • Nancy Ellen (1839 – 1880)
  • Baxter Richard (1841 – 1922)
  • Sarah (1845 – 1908)
  • John William (1846 – 1917)

Married: Elizabeth Ann SHRYACK (b. c. 1826) on 16 December 1852 in McDonough Co., Illinois

Children: Frances A. (1854 – 1933) , John W. (1855 – 1923) and daughter HAINLINE (d. 1858)

Source: Civil War Pension Index Card of David T. Hainline. Organization Index to Pension Files of Veterans Who Served Between 1861 and 1900. National Archives and Records Administration. Publication T289. Digital image purchased at Footnote [http://www.footnote.com/].

Enlisted: 22 August 1862; private. Enlisted 27 September 1862 in Co. I, 124th Illinois Infantry

Side served: Union

History of Unit: 124th Illinois Infantry

Discharged: 15 February 1863 for disability

Biography or Information of Interest: David is a bit of a mystery. While he died just after the war, it is not clear from what little information I can find if he died from a war-related injury or illness, although I suspect that is the case. Since I currently don’t have access to his pension records (for his wife and orphans), I don’t have the necessary details.

Died: 29 July 1865, McDonough Co., Illinois

Buried: Spring Creek Cemetery, Emmet Twp., McDonough Co., Illinois

A Civil War Soldier: Pvt. Baxter Richard HAINLINE (1841 – 1922)

How Related: Brother of my husband’s 2nd-great-grandmother, Susan W. HAINLINE

Born: 15 April 1841, Sciota, Sciota Twp., McDonough Co., Illinois

Parents: John W. HAINLINE (1796 – 1861) and Mary DeVERRE (1803 – 1871)

Siblings: Baxter was one of 11 children and one of three sons (like my Fredenburgs) to serve in the Union Army:

  • David Trimble (1827 – 1865)
  • Susan W. (1828 – 1914) – my husband’s ancestor
  • Mary DeVerre (1829 – 1892)
  • Henry C. (1831 – 1862)
  • Thomas Smith (1833 – 1895)
  • John H. (1834 – 1840)
  • Joseph Hardin (1837 – 1882)
  • Nancy Ellen (1839 – 1880)
  • Sarah (1845 – 1908)
  • John William (1846 – 1917)

Married: Sarah Emily RUSSELL (1848 – ) on 21 September 1865 in Sciota, McDonough Co., Illinois

Children: James R. (1866 – 1957), William Hardin (b. c. 1868), Paulina (b. c. 1870), Charles F. (b. c. 1872), Ellsworth E. (b. c. 1874), John (dates unknown) and Sadie Marie HAINLINE (1886 – 1970).

Source: Civil War Pension Index Card of Baxter Hainline. Organization Index to Pension Files of Veterans Who Served Between 1861 and 1900. National Archives and Records Administration. Publication T289. Digital image purchased at Footnote [http://www.footnote.com/].

Enlisted: 24 May 1861 in Co. A, 16th Illinois Infantry; private

Side served: Union

History of Unit: 16th Illinois Infantry

Discharged: 30 June 1865 for wounds

Biography or Information of Interest: There are three other Hainlines who served in Company A of the 16th Illinois Infantry, and they probably are Baxter’s cousins: James L., Nathan T. and William H. HAINLINE. While researching Baxter, I recently found some contact information for one of his descendants and am waiting to hear back.

Died: 1 January 1932 in Milwaukee, Clackamas Co., Oregon

Buried: unknown; probably in Oregon