A Civil War Soldier: Cpl. John HUBBY, Jr. (1840 – 1922)

How Related: Brother of my husband’s 2nd-great-grandmother, Rachel HUBBY

Born: 6 May 1840 in Kent Co., Ontario, Canada

Parents: John HUBBY, Sr. (1797 – 1880) and Hannah JONES (1812 – 1879)

Siblings: John was the fifth of 14 children, and one of two brothers who served in the Union Army:

  • Rachel (1832 – 1892) – my husband’s ancestor
  • Lois (b. 1835)
  • Sarah (b. 1836)
  • Eliza (b. 1838)
  • Edwin (b. 1842)
  • Meredy W. (1844 – 1900)
  • Mary J. (b. 1848)
  • Ellen (b. 1850)
  • Hannah (b. 1851)
  • Elizabeth (b. 1852)
  • Harriet (1854 – 1934)
  • George (1858 – 1934)
  • Clara Josephine (b. 1859)

Married: Mary WHEELER (1850 – 1919) on 6 June 1867 in Polk Co., Iowa

Children: Nettie Jane, Charles Edward (1873 – 1944), Gertrude, Mary Maude, Pierre Frank, and one unknown child who died before 1912.

Source: Civil War Pension Index Cards of John Hubby. Organization Index to Pension Files of Veterans Who Served Between 1861 and 1900. National Archives and Records Administration. Publication T289. Digital images purchased at Footnote [http://www.footnote.com/].

Enlisted: 13 August 1862 in Co. C, 44th Iowa Infantry; private. Enlisted 3 September 1862 in Co. G, 24th Iowa Infantry.

Side served: Union

Discharged: 23 August 1863 due to disability.

Biography or Information of Interest: John’s biography can be found on page 422 of the Compendium of History, Reminisce and Biography of Nebraska here. It contains interesting reading about his family life as well as his military experiences! He was also a member of Grand Army of the Republic posts 356 and 251 of Nebraska.

Died: 17 March 1922 in Lynch, Holt Co., Nebraska

Buried: South half of Lot 27, Pleasant Hill Cemetery, Lynch, Boyd Co., Nebraska

A Civil War Soldier: Cpl. John HUBBY, Jr. (1840 – 1922)

How Related: Brother of my husband’s 2nd-great-grandmother, Rachel HUBBY

Born: 6 May 1840 in Kent Co., Ontario, Canada

Parents: John HUBBY, Sr. (1797 – 1880) and Hannah JONES (1812 – 1879)

Siblings: John was the fifth of 14 children, and one of two brothers who served in the Union Army:

  • Rachel (1832 – 1892) – my husband’s ancestor
  • Lois (b. 1835)
  • Sarah (b. 1836)
  • Eliza (b. 1838)
  • Edwin (b. 1842)
  • Meredy W. (1844 – 1900)
  • Mary J. (b. 1848)
  • Ellen (b. 1850)
  • Hannah (b. 1851)
  • Elizabeth (b. 1852)
  • Harriet (1854 – 1934)
  • George (1858 – 1934)
  • Clara Josephine (b. 1859)

Married: Mary WHEELER (1850 – 1919) on 6 June 1867 in Polk Co., Iowa

Children: Nettie Jane, Charles Edward (1873 – 1944), Gertrude, Mary Maude, Pierre Frank, and one unknown child who died before 1912.

Source: Civil War Pension Index Cards of John Hubby. Organization Index to Pension Files of Veterans Who Served Between 1861 and 1900. National Archives and Records Administration. Publication T289. Digital images purchased at Footnote [http://www.footnote.com/].

Enlisted: 13 August 1862 in Co. C, 44th Iowa Infantry; private. Enlisted 3 September 1862 in Co. G, 24th Iowa Infantry.

Side served: Union

Discharged: 23 August 1863 due to disability.

Biography or Information of Interest: John’s biography can be found on page 422 of the Compendium of History, Reminisce and Biography of Nebraska here. It contains interesting reading about his family life as well as his military experiences! He was also a member of Grand Army of the Republic posts 356 and 251 of Nebraska.

Died: 17 March 1922 in Lynch, Holt Co., Nebraska

Buried: South half of Lot 27, Pleasant Hill Cemetery, Lynch, Boyd Co., Nebraska

A Civil War Soldier: Pvt. Meredy W. HUBBY (1844 – 1900)

How Related: Brother of my husband’s 2nd-great-grandmother, Rachel HUBBY

Born: 11 October 1844 in Shirland, Winnebago Co., Illinois

Parents: John HUBBY, Sr. (1797 – 1880) and Hannah JONES (1812 – 1879)

Siblings: Meredy was the seventh of 14 children, and one of two brothers who served in the Union Army:

  • Rachel (1832 – 1892) – my husband’s ancestor
  • Lois (b. 1835)
  • Sarah (b. 1836)
  • Eliza (b. 1838)
  • John, Jr. (1840 – 1922)
  • Edwin (b. 1842)
  • Mary J. (b. 1848)
  • Ellen (b. 1850)
  • Hannah (b. 1851)
  • Elizabeth (b. 1852)
  • Harriet (1854 – 1934)
  • George (1858 – 1934)
  • Clara Josephine (b. 1859)

Married: Nancy Ann REDMON (b. c. 1849) on 22 July 1871 in Boone Co., Iowa

Children: William J. (1874 – 1966), Maude, Edward Meredy, Nettie A., Susie, Lena HUBBY (b. c. 1878), plus infant twins who died at birth.

Source: Civil War Pension Index Card of Marriedy Hubby. Organization Index to Pension Files of Veterans Who Served Between 1861 and 1900. National Archives and Records Administration. Publication T289. Digital image purchased at Footnote [http://www.footnote.com/].

Enlisted: 10 May 1864; private. Enlisted 1 June 1864 in Co. C, 44th Iowa Infantry

Side served: Union

Mustered out: 15 September 1864 in Davenport, Iowa

Biography or Information of Interest: Meredy (also spelled Marriedy) was born to a couple who hailed respectively from either Scotland or Canada and New York State, John and Hannah (JONES) HUBBY. Hannah’s parents and family immigrated to Ontario from New York, and there she married John. Their first six children were born in Canada; their son John, Jr. in Kent Co., Ontario. Between 1842 and 1844, the family removed to Shirland, Winnebago Co., Illinois. In 1852, the family moved to Boone Co., Iowa, home of the city of Des Moines. Meredy joined up near the close of the war in the same regiment in which his older brother John, Jr. served. By 1880, Meredy and his wife Nancy and their children were settled in Holt Co., Nebraska in the Steel and Paddock Creek area. He was a member of Grand Army of the Republic post 251 of Nebraska.

Died: of paralysis on 15 April 1900 in Blackbird, Holt Co., Nebraska

Buried: Lot 86, Section 1 of the Union (Paddock) Cemetery, O’Neill, Holt Co., Nebraska

A Civil War Soldier: Pvt. Meredy W. HUBBY (1844 – 1900)

How Related: Brother of my husband’s 2nd-great-grandmother, Rachel HUBBY

Born: 11 October 1844 in Shirland, Winnebago Co., Illinois

Parents: John HUBBY, Sr. (1797 – 1880) and Hannah JONES (1812 – 1879)

Siblings: Meredy was the seventh of 14 children, and one of two brothers who served in the Union Army:

  • Rachel (1832 – 1892) – my husband’s ancestor
  • Lois (b. 1835)
  • Sarah (b. 1836)
  • Eliza (b. 1838)
  • John, Jr. (1840 – 1922)
  • Edwin (b. 1842)
  • Mary J. (b. 1848)
  • Ellen (b. 1850)
  • Hannah (b. 1851)
  • Elizabeth (b. 1852)
  • Harriet (1854 – 1934)
  • George (1858 – 1934)
  • Clara Josephine (b. 1859)

Married: Nancy Ann REDMON (b. c. 1849) on 22 July 1871 in Boone Co., Iowa

Children: William J. (1874 – 1966), Maude, Edward Meredy, Nettie A., Susie, Lena HUBBY (b. c. 1878), plus infant twins who died at birth.

Source: Civil War Pension Index Card of Marriedy Hubby. Organization Index to Pension Files of Veterans Who Served Between 1861 and 1900. National Archives and Records Administration. Publication T289. Digital image purchased at Footnote [http://www.footnote.com/].

Enlisted: 10 May 1864; private. Enlisted 1 June 1864 in Co. C, 44th Iowa Infantry

Side served: Union

Mustered out: 15 September 1864 in Davenport, Iowa

Biography or Information of Interest: Meredy (also spelled Marriedy) was born to a couple who hailed respectively from either Scotland or Canada and New York State, John and Hannah (JONES) HUBBY. Hannah’s parents and family immigrated to Ontario from New York, and there she married John. Their first six children were born in Canada; their son John, Jr. in Kent Co., Ontario. Between 1842 and 1844, the family removed to Shirland, Winnebago Co., Illinois. In 1852, the family moved to Boone Co., Iowa, home of the city of Des Moines. Meredy joined up near the close of the war in the same regiment in which his older brother John, Jr. served. By 1880, Meredy and his wife Nancy and their children were settled in Holt Co., Nebraska in the Steel and Paddock Creek area. He was a member of Grand Army of the Republic post 251 of Nebraska.

Died: of paralysis on 15 April 1900 in Blackbird, Holt Co., Nebraska

Buried: Lot 86, Section 1 of the Union (Paddock) Cemetery, O’Neill, Holt Co., Nebraska

A Civil War Soldier: Pvt. William Jasper DAILEY (1841 – 1920)

How Related: Brother of my husband’s 2nd-great-grandmother, Mariah Emily DAILEY.

Born: 24 March 1841 in Indiana (probably in Scott Twp., Montgomery Co.)

Parents: William DAILEY and Huldah REDENBAUGH

Siblings: Anna Margaret (1827 – 1917), Charles (b. 1829), Elizabeth (1834 – 1906), Catherine (b. 1836), Susan (b. c. 1838), Nancy (b. c. 1840), Louisa Jane (b. c. 1842), Samuel N. (b. 1844), and Marah Emily DAILEY (1849 – 1935). There also appear to be at least two females born between 1824 and 1828 who died in infancy.

Married: Rebecca Margaret HATCHER (1844 – 1926) on 6 November 1859 in Rockport, Atchison Co., Missouri

Children: Andrew Isaiah (1861 – 1926), Margaret Jane (b. c. 1866), William Addison (b. c. 1867), Joseph Ephram (b. c. 1869), Huldah Jane (b. c. 1872), Peter (b. c. 1873), David Jasper (b. 1875), Rebecca Jane (b. c. 1878), Hester Ellen (b. 1885) and Ted DAILEY (b. 1888).

Source: Civil War Pension Index Cards of William J. Dailey. Organization Index to Pension Files of Veterans Who Served Between 1861 and 1900. National Archives and Records Administration. Publication T289. Digital image purchased at Footnote [http://www.footnote.com/].


Enlisted:
10 October 1861, probaby at Sidney, Fremont Co., Iowa. Enlisted in Co. F, 15th Regiment Infantry, private on 18 November 1861.

Side Served: Union

History of Unit: 15th Iowa Infantry

Discharged: 16 December 1864

Biography or Information of Interest: William lived all over the Midwest, moving often during his lifetime until he settled down in Custer County, Oklahoma by 1910. Born in Indiana, he lived in Iowa, married in Missouri (where his wife was born), and lived in Kansas and Oklahoma. In each of these states, he can be found in different communities over time. While I don’t know much about William or the reasons for his migrations, I do know that his sister Mariah, my husband’s ancestor, also ended up in Oklahoma, as did their brother Samuel. It seems this family was typical of many American families in that they migrated to new locations together.

Unlike the two previous Civil War soldiers I’ve featured, William lived a long life and appears to have been disability-free. He received a pension from the federal government for his service, which his wife continued to get after his death until her own.

Died: 20 April 1905 in Weatherford, Custer Co., Oklahoma

Source: Tombstone of William J. and Rebecca Dailey. Greenwood Cemetery, Weatherford, Custer Co., Oklahoma. Photographed by Anna Hayes, photo volunteer for Find A Grave [http://www.findagrave.com/]. 2007.

Buried: Plot B, Greenwood Cemetery, Weatherford, Custer Co., Oklahoma

A Civil War Soldier: Pvt. William Jasper DAILEY (1841 – 1920)

How Related: Brother of my husband’s 2nd-great-grandmother, Mariah Emily DAILEY.

Born: 24 March 1841 in Indiana (probably in Scott Twp., Montgomery Co.)

Parents: William DAILEY and Huldah REDENBAUGH

Siblings: Anna Margaret (1827 – 1917), Charles (b. 1829), Elizabeth (1834 – 1906), Catherine (b. 1836), Susan (b. c. 1838), Nancy (b. c. 1840), Louisa Jane (b. c. 1842), Samuel N. (b. 1844), and Marah Emily DAILEY (1849 – 1935). There also appear to be at least two females born between 1824 and 1828 who died in infancy.

Married: Rebecca Margaret HATCHER (1844 – 1926) on 6 November 1859 in Rockport, Atchison Co., Missouri

Children: Andrew Isaiah (1861 – 1926), Margaret Jane (b. c. 1866), William Addison (b. c. 1867), Joseph Ephram (b. c. 1869), Huldah Jane (b. c. 1872), Peter (b. c. 1873), David Jasper (b. 1875), Rebecca Jane (b. c. 1878), Hester Ellen (b. 1885) and Ted DAILEY (b. 1888).

Source: Civil War Pension Index Cards of William J. Dailey. Organization Index to Pension Files of Veterans Who Served Between 1861 and 1900. National Archives and Records Administration. Publication T289. Digital image purchased at Footnote [http://www.footnote.com/].


Enlisted:
10 October 1861, probaby at Sidney, Fremont Co., Iowa. Enlisted in Co. F, 15th Regiment Infantry, private on 18 November 1861.

Side Served: Union

History of Unit: 15th Iowa Infantry

Discharged: 16 December 1864

Biography or Information of Interest: William lived all over the Midwest, moving often during his lifetime until he settled down in Custer County, Oklahoma by 1910. Born in Indiana, he lived in Iowa, married in Missouri (where his wife was born), and lived in Kansas and Oklahoma. In each of these states, he can be found in different communities over time. While I don’t know much about William or the reasons for his migrations, I do know that his sister Mariah, my husband’s ancestor, also ended up in Oklahoma, as did their brother Samuel. It seems this family was typical of many American families in that they migrated to new locations together.

Unlike the two previous Civil War soldiers I’ve featured, William lived a long life and appears to have been disability-free. He received a pension from the federal government for his service, which his wife continued to get after his death until her own.

Died: 20 April 1905 in Weatherford, Custer Co., Oklahoma

Source: Tombstone of William J. and Rebecca Dailey. Greenwood Cemetery, Weatherford, Custer Co., Oklahoma. Photographed by Anna Hayes, photo volunteer for Find A Grave [http://www.findagrave.com/]. 2007.

Buried: Plot B, Greenwood Cemetery, Weatherford, Custer Co., Oklahoma

A WWII Letter from My Grandfather

A couple things I’ve read lately reminded me that I had a special keepsake: a letter my paternal grandfather wrote his parents during World War II: Becky has been transcribing her letters from boot camp to home; and a reader of Family Tree Magazine recently wrote in response to their February 2007 article “Preserving Memories” that envelopes of letters should be saved, as they often contain vital information to complete what’s in the letter.

The letter I have was saved because it mentioned that my grandfather, Robert Lewis Robbins, had frozen his fingers during the service. I’m sure it was used toward obtaining some sort of disability pension from the military. He and his brother, Bill, Jr., signed up together and served in the 1452nd Army Air Force, Air Transport Command. Bob worked as a flight mechanic and achieved the rank of sergeant before he was discharged.

So that you understand some of the people mentioned in the letter: Bob, my grandfather, was married to my grandmother, Jeanne, and they had two children at the time of this letter: two-year-old Louise and 6-month-old Bryan (my dad). My grandfather was the oldest of five siblings; the rest of the family included Bill, Jr., Shirley (not mentioned), Jack, and Joyce. My grandmother, aunt and father were living in Edmonton, Alberta to be near where my grandfather was stationed. Great-uncle Bill was also married to Josephine, a Edmontonian, although she’s not mentioned here. The letter was written to Bob’s parents, William Bryan ROBBINS, Sr. and Marie LEWIS.

The letter is written in cursive pencil on United States Army Air Forces stationery with a matching envelope. It’s addressed from:

Sgt R Robbins 16086708
Sq F, 1452 AAF Base Unit
AIRO 462 c/o P.M. Minn, Minn.

and is addressed to:

Mr & Mrs Wm B Robbins
Coopersville
Michigan

Instead of a stamp, Bob has written “Free” and the faded postmark says “U.S. ARMY POSTAL SERVICE, DEC 23 1944 402”

A note has been scrawled across the front in ink:

Save
Record of Bob freezing
finger en route on flight

Dec 14/44

Dear folks

Am now over the headwaters of the Mississippi in northern Minn. or Dakota heading south. We are going to some place in Ill. to a hospital with a patient we picked up in the Artic [sic] early this morning. I frosted my two thumbs and a couple of fingers last night when we had some mechanical trouble I had to correct in sub-zero temps in a forty mile an hour wind. Just like Michigan. I should be back to our base by this time tomorrow. I can’t get back too quick to suit me this time though because Jeanne took Bryan to the hospital with a bad cold day before yesterday. He wasn’t very bad but they have so much better facolities [sic] there than we have in one room and they seemed very willing to keep him there for a couple of days. He’s such a tiny guy that we hated to have him in someone else’s care but as he would be better off we think it’s best, at least for a couple of days.

Sure glad to hear Jack is in the Navy. I’m sure he’ll get along OK. We’ll drop him a line as soon as possible congratulating him. And I do bet it’s a relief for you folks. I suppose Bill will be leaving soon, two weeks is all too short to be at home only once a year. We’ll soon be coming into Minneapolis now so will finish this later

01:00 o’clock
Dec 23/44

Was just going thru my bag and found this letter that I’d never finished. Bryan is well and home now, he was in the hospital just one week. Am now on my way back to base from a trip to Montana. Which reminds me that I was down here just before or on Christmas day last year too. Jeanne and I have a little tree and we look forward to having a very merry Xmas for our little family. We have all kinds of presents for Louise and Bryan. Say sure thought that turtle that Joyce made was cute and it’s a very practical little pillow too. I bet Bryan will spend hours on it. Last week I made Bryan a pottie chair out of an orange crate and I’m just as proud of the design & workmanship as can be. I’ve been getting to see quite a bit of the family in spite of all my traveling lately. I wish we could all be together for this Christmas, but in our family we’re together in mind if not in body so I sincerly [sic] wish each of you still there at home a most merry Christmas and may God bless you all, every one.

Bob

P.S. Bill is back, going strong. he has a new job now no more flying for him, too much rank. Incidentaly [sic] that was Moline, Ill & Davenport Iowa that I was at. Just had a short layover though, and I slept all of those few hours