Resources for Local Native American Research

November is American Indian Heritage Month, so I thought I would share a list of resources for local Native American research. This list was compiled by Larry Fine for the Colville [Washington] Stake Family History Conference held April 26, 2008. I had been invited to speak on military records for the conference, and after my presentation, manned a table on military resources in the main room. Next to me was a table on Native American research, at which was sitting a familiar-looking gentleman. Larry Fine was my high school teacher for Algebra I and Computer Programming (we learned Basic on those old Macintoshes)! Larry told me he had begun to trace his roots about 10 years ago, discovering he had Metis ancestry (a mix of local Native American and French heritage…Northeast Washington was explored by early French furtraders) going back at least 150 years in the Colville Valley. He had developed the following list through his extensive research, and has a large personal collection of printed materials on local Native history. I thought about the irony of it all: the man who had taught me how to use a computer–a tool I use to do research and teach others genealogy–had himself become interested in his roots.

Microfilmed Native American Records on Permanent Loan at the Colville Family History Center
Bureau of Indian Affairs and Colville Tribe Indian Records

  • *1020972: BIA – Indian History Cards, Late 1800 – Early 1900
  • *1020973: Births, Marriages, Deaths
  • *1020974: Births and Deaths, 1909 – 1942
  • *1020975: Births and Deaths, 1914 – 1943
  • *1020976: Births, Deaths, Marriages: 1914 – 1943
  • *1020976: BIA – Annuity Roll Records, 1892 – 1948
  • *05742208: BIA – Indian Census Rolls, 1885 – 1891: Coeur d’Alene, Kalispel, Lake, Spokane, Nez Perce, Okanogan, Moses, Yellow Bulls
  • *05742209: BIA – Indian Census Rolls, 1892 – 1897: Okanogan, Nez Perce, Colville, Lake, Spokane, Moses, Nespelem, San Poil, Coeur d’Alene
  • *05742210: BIA – Indian Census Rolls, 1898 – 1903: Spokane, Moses, Okanogan, Nez Perce, Coeur d’Alene, Lake, Colville
  • *05742211: BIA – Indian Census Rolls, 1904 – 1908: Spokane, Colville, Coeur d’Alene, Nez Perce, Moses, Okanogan, Lake, Sanpoil, Nespelem
  • *05742212: BIA – Indian Census Rolls, 1909 – 1913: Spokane, Sanpoil, Moses, Nez Perce, Nespelem, Okanogan, Lake, Colville, Calispel, Wenatchi, Chewelah, Kootnai
  • *05742215: BIA – Indian Census Rolls, 1938 – 1938: Supplemental rolls of Colville and Spokane JOPA (also available at Foley Center Library, Gonzaga University)
  • *16711660: Washington – St. Paul – Jesuit Mission – with baptism registers, various entries from 1839 – 1870
  • *16711661: Washington – St. Regis – Jesuit Mission – with various baptism, death, and marriage records, 1848 – 1917
  • *16711662: Washington – St. Regis – Jesuit Mission – burial records, 1953 – 1887; baptism and marriage records, 1852 – 1866; St. Francis Regis Quarterly Indian School reports, 1893; Colville Reservation census,1902 – 1918, 1923, and 1937; Spokane Indian census, 1919 and 1927
  • *16711663: Washington – St. Regis: papers and correspondence
  • *16711664: Washington – St. Mary’s: mission parish census, 1948 – 1949

Libraries


Sources to Consider


Items to Check

  • *Annuity records of various tribes
  • *Birth, baptism, marriage, death and burial records or registers
  • *Books: history, biographies
  • *Census: Federal and tribal
  • *Family history files
  • *Land patents
  • *Military discharges
  • *Obituaries
  • *Oral history reports
  • *Probate records with the Bureau of Indian Affairs or Office of Special Trustee
  • *Tribal allotments
  • *Tribal enrollment records
  • *Tribal school enrollments
  • *Wills

The CHAPLIN – MARTIN Marriage Certificate


Source: Chaplin – Martin Certificate of Marriage. Washington. Clark County. Marriage Certificates 1889 – 1977. Digital image. Washington State Digitial Archives. http://www.digitalarchives.wa.gov/ : 2008.

Yes, I realize that Wordless Wednesday is supposed to be about displaying a photograph, not a document. Inspired by George Geder’s posts of posting ancestral photos on Wednesday and then a biographical sketch on Thursdays, I started doing WW back in February, based on a pattern of showing ancestral photos from my father-in-law’s, father’s, mother-in-law’s, and mother’s family trees, in that order. The problem was, I don’t have access to many photos from my mother-in-law’s family, and I don’t believe she does, either. Unless I can come in contact with some of her relatives and obtain scans of ancestral photos (if there are any), I’m relegated to displaying photos of tombstones and images of documents. So be it!

I did want to feature this document, however, for a variety of reasons. My husband’s family (both parents’ sides) has lived in this state since the early 1900s, and Washington State has a wonderful open-record policy, perhaps one of the best in the nation. In addition, the Washington State Digital Archives and FamilySearch Labs are featuring both indexes and images of county, state, and federal records for Washington residents. I’m waiting impatiently for FamilySearch to release the images that have been indexed on their pilot site, and decided to help them along by doing some indexing on that specific collection. That in itself has been a lot of fun…to see records from Stevens County (where my parents live), Spokane County (my residence), and Klickatat County (which we pass through on the way to visit my in-laws). I recognize all these little towns which certainly helps in determining messy handwritten locations on death certificates!

Besides featuring a document with personal sentiment from the fabulous digital archives site, I thought this record was unique because it contains the signatures of four my husband’s direct ancestors. John Franklin and Angelia Rebecca (LUKE) MARTIN were Leona Mary MARTIN’s parents. Forest “Frank” L. CHAPLIN and Leona were my mother-in-law’s parents. I’ve always seen Forest’s name spelled with two Rs, but here he signs it with one. Hmm… I had the privilege of meeting the widowed Leona once–at our wedding–and then attended her funeral in 1993. I’ve mentioned Leona and her twin brother Lee before in one of my earlier Wordless Wednesdays.

The CHAPLIN – MARTIN Marriage Certificate


Source: Chaplin – Martin Certificate of Marriage. Washington. Clark County. Marriage Certificates 1889 – 1977. Digital image. Washington State Digitial Archives. http://www.digitalarchives.wa.gov/ : 2008.

Yes, I realize that Wordless Wednesday is supposed to be about displaying a photograph, not a document. Inspired by George Geder’s posts of posting ancestral photos on Wednesday and then a biographical sketch on Thursdays, I started doing WW back in February, based on a pattern of showing ancestral photos from my father-in-law’s, father’s, mother-in-law’s, and mother’s family trees, in that order. The problem was, I don’t have access to many photos from my mother-in-law’s family, and I don’t believe she does, either. Unless I can come in contact with some of her relatives and obtain scans of ancestral photos (if there are any), I’m relegated to displaying photos of tombstones and images of documents. So be it!

I did want to feature this document, however, for a variety of reasons. My husband’s family (both parents’ sides) has lived in this state since the early 1900s, and Washington State has a wonderful open-record policy, perhaps one of the best in the nation. In addition, the Washington State Digital Archives and FamilySearch Labs are featuring both indexes and images of county, state, and federal records for Washington residents. I’m waiting impatiently for FamilySearch to release the images that have been indexed on their pilot site, and decided to help them along by doing some indexing on that specific collection. That in itself has been a lot of fun…to see records from Stevens County (where my parents live), Spokane County (my residence), and Klickatat County (which we pass through on the way to visit my in-laws). I recognize all these little towns which certainly helps in determining messy handwritten locations on death certificates!

Besides featuring a document with personal sentiment from the fabulous digital archives site, I thought this record was unique because it contains the signatures of four my husband’s direct ancestors. John Franklin and Angelia Rebecca (LUKE) MARTIN were Leona Mary MARTIN’s parents. Forest “Frank” L. CHAPLIN and Leona were my mother-in-law’s parents. I’ve always seen Forest’s name spelled with two Rs, but here he signs it with one. Hmm… I had the privilege of meeting the widowed Leona once–at our wedding–and then attended her funeral in 1993. I’ve mentioned Leona and her twin brother Lee before in one of my earlier Wordless Wednesdays.

The HOEKSTRA Girls

Featured in the February 23rd Edition of Terry Thornton’s “Harvest from the Blog Garden” at Hill Country of Monroe County, Mississippi.

I learned about George Geder’s Genealogy~Photography~Restoration blog through Craig Manson of GeneaBlogie, I think. George has been doing Wordless Wednesday posts for a while, both of his ancestral photos and of his fantastic own pix (he’s a photographer by trade). Imitation being the sincerest form of flattery, I thought I’d emulate his actions here.

These two little cuties are my maternal grandmother, Ruth Lillian HOEKSTRA, and her younger sister, Hope Mildred HOEKSTRA, taken as the captions indicate, in Tacoma, Pierce County, Washington in 1921, when Grandma was 35 months old, and Hope was 13 months. This would have been in December of that year, as Grandma was born on 16 January 1919.

Ruth and Hope were the oldest of three girls born to my great-grandparents, John Martin HOEKSTRA and Lillian Fern STRONG. Originally from Grand Rapids, Michigan, John, Lillian and Ruth came out West for a few years because John’s parents, Martin HOEKSTRA and Jennie TON, and his brother and sister-in-law, Peter Louis Ton HOEKSTRA and Reatha Pearl DONOVAN, had also relocated there for better job opportunities. Lillian’s parents, Charles Frisbe STRONG and Mary Lucy WRIGHT, were living several hundred miles south near Hubbard, Marion County, Oregon, with her brother Frank Charles STRONG. While the family was out west, Hope was born in Tacoma. The Hoekstra family returned to Michigan and remained there for the rest of their days. Mary Louise HOEKSTRA, John and Lillian’s youngest daughter, was born in 1923 in Grand Rapids.

Ironically, after Hope grew up and married, she moved to Tacoma with her husband, had four children, and died and was buried there in 1968…the same city in which she was born.

The HOEKSTRA Girls

Featured in the February 23rd Edition of Terry Thornton’s “Harvest from the Blog Garden” at Hill Country of Monroe County, Mississippi.

I learned about George Geder’s Genealogy~Photography~Restoration blog through Craig Manson of GeneaBlogie, I think. George has been doing Wordless Wednesday posts for a while, both of his ancestral photos and of his fantastic own pix (he’s a photographer by trade). Imitation being the sincerest form of flattery, I thought I’d emulate his actions here.

These two little cuties are my maternal grandmother, Ruth Lillian HOEKSTRA, and her younger sister, Hope Mildred HOEKSTRA, taken as the captions indicate, in Tacoma, Pierce County, Washington in 1921, when Grandma was 35 months old, and Hope was 13 months. This would have been in December of that year, as Grandma was born on 16 January 1919.

Ruth and Hope were the oldest of three girls born to my great-grandparents, John Martin HOEKSTRA and Lillian Fern STRONG. Originally from Grand Rapids, Michigan, John, Lillian and Ruth came out West for a few years because John’s parents, Martin HOEKSTRA and Jennie TON, and his brother and sister-in-law, Peter Louis Ton HOEKSTRA and Reatha Pearl DONOVAN, had also relocated there for better job opportunities. Lillian’s parents, Charles Frisbe STRONG and Mary Lucy WRIGHT, were living several hundred miles south near Hubbard, Marion County, Oregon, with her brother Frank Charles STRONG. While the family was out west, Hope was born in Tacoma. The Hoekstra family returned to Michigan and remained there for the rest of their days. Mary Louise HOEKSTRA, John and Lillian’s youngest daughter, was born in 1923 in Grand Rapids.

Ironically, after Hope grew up and married, she moved to Tacoma with her husband, had four children, and died and was buried there in 1968…the same city in which she was born.

Wordless Wednesday: The HOEKSTRA Girls

Source: Hoekstra, Ruth Lillian and Hope Mildred. Photograph. 1921. Original photograph in the possession of Miriam Robbins Midkiff, Spokane, Washington. 2008.

Wordless Wednesday: The HOEKSTRA Girls

Source: Hoekstra, Ruth Lillian and Hope Mildred. Photograph. 1921. Original photograph in the possession of Miriam Robbins Midkiff, Spokane, Washington. 2008.